This weeks News – August 31

This weeks news August 31

Instigators were a UK hardcore band who played Ireland in 1988. I remember being blown away by their onstage antics as singer Andy Turner used the wooden stage as a springboard. he moved trampoline like from amp to amp, corner to corner. Their first album was re-issued on Skuld last year, with the Second Now available for pre order from Boss Tuneage

Also available to preorder on Boss Tuneage is Retard Picnic by the Stupids.

It’s not just UK bands that are getting re-issues – US legendary hardcore band The Dicks have had some of their records re-issed by Alternative tentacles including Kill from the heart . There is a movie about the band being screened around the States over the next while.

On the way

slf
Many of us old punks remember Stiff Little Fingers as having some classic punk songs. Infalmmable material was the album that took us away from our 4 bedroom walls and inspired many to make their own noise. Henry Cluney and Jim Reilly from the band are back playing as XSLF. They are returning to Dublin on September 19 to play in Fibber Magees. Also on the bill are Dublin Street Punk band, Hooligan, Dundalk punkers The GAKK and Clash Jam Wallop. All for €10, bargain

There’s plenty of excitment for Fuzz coming to Dublin this week. They are bringing their riff laden sound to Whelans on Wednesday. As U:mack put it “The mood is not light. The songs project a state of perpetual paranoia and eroding mental health.
And as it should be, you know? It’s a record for the burners.”

Dublin Songs and Stories was an event organised by the people behind Come here to me blog. It was a night exactly as described and raised over €2,000 for Pieta Housse. The second colume is on this week and is a benefit for Rape Crisis centre. BP Fallon, Steve Averill and ADW will be telliong some tales, Mick Pyro and John Flynn will be singing some songs and there will be loads more in between. Sounds like a great night ahead .

Forthcoming Gigs

Fuzz – Whelans – September 2

Dublin Songs and Stories – Sugar Club -September 3

Workmans Club 5th Birthday Celebrations – Sept 8th – 12th
Al Porter – Sept 8th
The Hot Sprockets – Sept 9th
Little Green Cars w/ guests Other Creatures – Sept 10th
Little Green Cars w/ guests Bleeding Heart Pigeons – Sept 11th
Eternal Summers w/ guests Pleasure Beach – Sept 12th
Tickets to all shows just €5

Jello Biafra + Paranoid Visions + Sissy – Hangar September 9

Vic Goddard and Subway Sect + The Dubtones + Gakk – Fibber Magees – September 11

Eternal Summers + Plpeasure Beach – Workmans Club – September 12

Dope Body – Whelans – September 12

August Wells – Workmans Club – September 13

Sleaford Mods – Hangar – September 19

XSLF + Hooligan – Fibber Magees – September 19

La Misma + Disguise + Overbite + Surge – Dublin September 20
Unknown Mortal Orchestra – Whelans – September 26

Wheatus – Whelans – September 28

B Dolan – Wormkans Club – September 29

We Shall Overcome – Dublin – October 2-4

Hard Working Class Heroes – Dublin – October 2+3

Juan Wauters + No Monster Club – Whelans – October 4

The Lemonheads – Academy – October 5

Hey Rosetta – Workmans Club – October 9

Giveamanakick – Whelans – October 10

Nothing Clean – Tenterhooks – October 10

Cockney Rejects – Grand Social – October 10

Inner Terrestials – Fibber Magees – October 16

English Dogs – Fibber Magees – October 23

dAVID kITT – wHELANS – oCTOBER 24

Litovsk – Dublin – October 25

US Girls – Whelans – October 25

Liturgy – Whelans – October 26

Dragster + Angry Itch + Stop start Again + Black Pitts + Jobseekers – Fibbers – October 30

Deer hunter button factory – November 1

Slaves – The Academy – November 5

Girl Band – Button Factory – November 7

Stiff Little Fingers – The Academy – November 13

Coitus + Paranoid Visions + Coldwar + Liberty – Fibbers – November 14

Mercury Rev – Button Factory November 22

Chelsea Wolfe – Button Factory November 25

Peter Hook and the Light – The Academy – November 27

OM – Button Factory – November 28

Therapy – Button Factory December 11

The Selecter – The Academy – December 11

Bad Manners – The Academy – december 28

This weeks News – August 24

Round Up August 24

visions

Paranoid Visions have just released their new record. Cryptic Cross Words is the 5th album the band have released since their 2006 reboot. Add to this the multitude of singles and a myriad of
historical re-releases and compilations and it becomes clear that Paranoid Visions are a band who are not content to sit back and relax or attempt to trade on past glories. Indeed founder members Deko and P.A are of the opinion that there are no past glories with the recent releases being more reflective of what the band were about in the first place. Cryptic Cross Words, a culmination of a year’s recording and writing is an attempt to craft a specific album with a specific modus operandi.“With every release we have done, there has always been a compromise, and certain styles or genres we have wanted to explore have been almost achieved, but not executed the way we imagined them…until now”.
Switching rhythm section and losing a backing vocalist in early 2014 gave the band the opportunity to form the perfect line-up and create what the band believe is best album they have ever made. It’s
certainly a more focussed and strategic release that relies on soundscapes and moods that co-exist with the various musical genres the band continues to dip into. But it explores these cohesively
with production that has been described by one early reviewer as being “crisp but avoids the sheen of the nu”. Certainly this album owes as much to UK Decay as it does to UK Subs, or is “more
magazine than fanzine”.Lyrically the album is tackling different subjects ranging from the Catholic Churches abuse of
children, invasion in the Ukraine, sexual harmony, working culture and the voice of the downtrodden public on the verge of snapping. In the case of Anagram Sam the lyrics consist entirely of anagrams
(Anagram Sam, he’s one of those NAMELESS SALESMEN, his LIFE is a FILE of anagrams, he’s the SENATOR for TREASON etc etc….you get the picture!!) whilst the album’s closer, “baNAMA Republic” is a
delicate slow building acoustic song spanning seven minutes and sung by Aoife Destruction detailing the fall of the Irish economy and the corruption that facilitated it.
The album which I bought today in Tower Records is an aesthetically beautiful white vinyl LP with free CD and 16 page booklet which includes a real cryptic cross word and word search on the sleeve

jimmycake

Dublin’s the Jimmy Cake have their fourth album launched this week. 2724 days after 2008’s Spectre and Crown. Teen Mist is the shortest track on the LP, clocking in at a radio friendly 15 minutes and 10 seconds long. Master is three compositions laid out over a 72-minute journey through space, time and a musty & secluded railway arch off North Strand Road, Dublin where engineer, producer & hero John Spud
Murphy lost his mind but gained a twitch. Gone are the lush strings & understated beats of Spectre & Crown, replaced by vintage synths & psychedelic rhythms to create an ever-morphing, technicoloured
behemoth of a record.

Available on CD, 180g double vinyl & download, Master is accompanied by blackly comical album artwork by UK illustrator & cult hero Jack Teagle & housed in a magnificently eccentric design by band member Paul G Smyth.

katesparty

In a week of record launches Kate’s Party are doing one with a twist. They are launching a tape this week which is doubling as a fundraiser for their upcoming UK tour. Should be a cracking evening.

holly

As mentioned last week Holly Golightly is bringining out her new album this week, first since 2004 -The band consists of Matt Radford (double bass) Ed Deegan (guitar) Holly Golightly (vocals) Bruce
Brand (drums) Bradley Burgess (guitar) Holly first came to musical prominence as a member of Thee Headcoatees, a Billy Childish/Thee
Headcoats all-girl splinter group in 1991. Four years later she broke away from the garage punk scene with the release of her debut solo album The Good Things, which featured a mix of folk, early electric blues, & ’60s beat influenced rock ‘n’ roll. It’s a template that she’s honed over the course of 13 solo albums, along the way impressing celebrity fans such as Jim Jarmusch (Holly’s track “Tell Me Now So I Know” featured as the main title theme in his Broken Flowers movie), and most notably Jack White who duetted with Holly on
“It’s True That We Love One Another”, the final track on the classic White Stripes album Elephant. Though it’s been 11 years since her last solo album, Holly’s been busy as half of blues/Americana duo Holly Golightly & The Brokeoffs (The Brokeoffs being multi-instrumentalist Lawyer Dave). The pair have released a string of well received albums, and undertaken many tours on both sides of the
Atlantic.
Slowtown Now! features 12 songs that will please fans old and new alike. Why not have a listen to
Seven Wonders

On the way
THe workmans club was a welcome addition to the Dublin gig scene 5 years. As it celebrates that milestone they are puttng on a week of gigs with low admission price. I will be up in the hangar
two night (at Jello and The Ex) but in case you’re interested

The party continues Sept 8th – 12th with shows from….
Al Porter – Sept 8th
The Hot Sprockets – Sept 9th
Little Green Cars w/ guests Other Creatures – Sept 10th
Little Green Cars w/ guests Bleeding Heart Pigeons – Sept 11th
Eternal Summers w/ guests Pleasure Beach – Sept 12th
Tickets to all shows just €5

Forthcoming Gigs

Pine hill haints – Tenterhooks August 27

The drays – lesson lounge August 207

Kate’s party + Spines + Stariwells + Glassgears – bello bar August 28

The Jimmy Cake – Hangar – August 29

Protex babyshakes number ones bello bar August 29

Warzone Festival – Belfast – August 29

Polyphonic Spree – Academy August 31

Fuzz – Whelans – September 2

Jello Biafra + Paranoid Visions + Sissy – Hangar September 9

Vic Goddard and Subway Sect + The Dubtones + Gakk – Fibber Magees – September 11

Eternal Summers + Plpeasure Beach – Workmans Club – September 12

Dope Body – Whelans – September 12

August Wells – Workmans Club – September 13

Sleaford Mods – Hangar – September 19

XSLF + Hooligan – Fibber Magees – September 19

La Misma + Disguise + Overbite + Surge – Dublin September 20

Unknown Mortal Orchestra – Whelans – September 26

Wheatus – Whelans – September 28

B Dolan – Wormkans Club – September 29

We Shall Overcome – Dublin – October 2-4

Hard Working Class Heroes – Dublin – October 2+3

Juan Wauters + No Monster Club – Whelans – October 4

The Lemonheads – Academy – October 5

Hey Rosetta – Workmans Club – October 9

Giveamanakick – Whelans – October 10

Nothing Clean – Tenterhooks – October 10

Cockney Rejects – Grand Social – October 10

Inner Terrestials – Fibber Magees – October 16

English Dogs – Fibber Magees – October 23

dAVID kITT – wHELANS – oCTOBER 24

Litovsk – Dublin – October 25

US Girls – Whelans – October 25

Liturgy – Whelans – October 26

Dragster + Angry Itch + Stop start Again + Black Pitts + Jobseekers – Fibbers – October 30

Deer hunter button factory – November 1

Slaves – The Academy – November 5

Girl Band – Button Factory – November 7

Stiff Little Fingers – The Academy – November 13

Coitus + Paranoid Visions + Coldwar + Liberty – Fibbers – November 14

Mercury Rev – Button Factory November 22

Chelsea Wolfe – Button Factory November 25

Peter Hook and the Light – The Academy – November 27

OM – Button Factory – November 28

Therapy – Button Factory December 11

The Selecter – The Academy – December 11

Bad Manners – The Academy – december 28

niallhope

Joe Solo, helping us to Overcome

wso

I originally did this interview for my http://radioactiveinternational.org/hope-show-100-we-shall-overcome/ and also for some publicity around We Shall Over Come weekend https://www.facebook.com/WSODublin?fref=ts>  which I’m helping out with.  As they say themselves We Shall Overcome’ is a simple shout out to the people who make our culture happen – the musicians, artists, promoters. For one weekend, let’s do what we do but let’s do it under one unified banner – We Shall Overcome. Let’s do it together to show our solidarity and send a message that we don’t agree with austerity politics.

Let’s all work for free that weekend and encourage our audience to bring food for foodbanks or make donations to homeless projects. Sometimes when things feel hopeless, it’s good to sing, laugh and be around people. It’s just a gesture, it won’t change the world but it may just change someone’s? Want to join us?

 

Also Joe was in Lithium Joe who the Hope Collective helped with some gigs in the 90s.  Whilst these gigs weren’t the best attended of the many Hope put on the band were on of a cohort of groups that got what we were doing. They were happy to be in ireland, enjoyed playing music to people who were interested and enjoyed the whole d.i.y aspect of it. Since the band ceased paying together Joe as released a lot of music (15 albums) all acoustic with some help of pots and pans and whatever’s lying around. All are self released and completely independent.

Just want to give a broad outline of your background so can we start way back, was lithium Joe your first band? What music were you listening to at the time?

Lithium Joe was the second band I was in.  I started a band while I was at school banging out punk covers so I was playing Undertones, Stiff Little Fingers and Clash songs in 87 88. I started writing my own songs but the band folded.  I did a couple of years of busking. I cut my teeth learning folk standards, Elvis Costello and Steve Earle and then started Lithium Joe in the 90’s and did that for ten years, great fun

What inspired you to pick up a guitar?

Roots, Radicals, Rocker and Reggae by Stiff Little Fingers – crackle bang his wallop that was it – never been the same since

Lithium Joe released their own records, was there a specific reason for this? Did you try and get a deal? Have you ever sent tapes to record companies?

At the start I wasn’t really aware of how to do it any other way so we started making tapes in 92′ 93 the same way that everybody else was doing but it soon became apparent as our peers got signed but it didn’t seem that it would be right for us.  They were locked away in London, being told to do this and more or less being told what type of songs to be playing.  It struck me as something we didn’t want to do.  By then the Punk DIY scene was on our horizons and we thought this is the way to go.  We can do it ourselves for buttons and we got the freedom of expression.  The sort of thing that when you listen in later years this was what Joe Strummer and John Lennon were pining for.  They both felt they’d sold out and it could have been so different and we decided to trod our own path.  I’ve never regretted that, it was the right thing to do.  We could do whatever we wanted to, we could make our own mistakes, I wouldn’t dream of doing it any other way now.

 

The band played some gigs in Ireland which I was involved in as part of the Hope Collective, can you remember how it started? Where did you hear of hope collective?

It was Rick from Smile and Be Happy records after we put out an ep with them, we became acquainted with yourselves, and it was roughly around that time.  We played 4 or 5 dates and had an absolute whale of a time, the rest of the time around the uk we were booking our own, it was hard work trying to hold down jobs to earn enough money to hire vans to go out there and do our thing and still save enough money to put our records out.  The experience of going out and doing it for yourself is very empowering.  You can’t beat it. Everything I have done in music has led me to where I am now; it’s taught me loads of lessons, maybe slow ones.  I still feel I’m on top of my game and some of my peers have either given up or they’ve become jaded by playing that other game.  Because I never have done that, everything feels fresh, exciting and new to me.  I don’t have the albatross of a hit record I have to play every night dangling around my neck.  Everything is open.  I literally feel as if I can do anything in music because I haven’t been chained down.  I think that’s what Lennon and Strummer were alluding to – that sense of freedom and possibility was lost to them.  They had to work within a series of boundaries that they had chosen to embrace to become stars and they were always tied by them

 

Even though your music tells stories of issues affecting people’s lives there seems to be an air of positivity around you, how do you manage to stay upbeat after twenty odd years?

I like to keep it that way; I don’t need to force it.  I genuinely do feel positive about things.  I always think there’s hope out there, I always see the good in people and see the possibilities in what happens.  It’s how we shall overcome was born, not sulking about an election result, it’s what can we do about it.  I’ve always tried to move forward like that. There’s no point in sulking. My Mam always taught me that, she wouldn’t speak to us if were sulking and we soon learned not to. I always feel positive about things, there’s always something you can do, always some angle you can approach, always something you can try that you’ve never tried before.  It’s the only way forward

 

What music did Lithium Joe release?

There were 52 different Lithium Joe songs recorded, 7 or 8 demos, 4 eps, an album and mini album.  There was plenty out there, looking back we didn’t always get it right.  I don’t think you do though, you’re experimenting and making mistakes as you go.  You don’t always see it for what it is until much later on.  I’m still proud of it, I think we did a good job and made a decent fist of doing our thing.  Some of the things I was writing about strike me as being wise from time to time even though I was twenty years younger, normally you would expect to be wincing at your own arrogance or sense of self importance.  I think some of the things I was trying to get across I’m still trying to get across now, in a different way.  It’s less about me and more about telling it through different characters.

Why did the band stop?

It became a little bit difficult to carry it on.  We were all partnered up and were having kids.  The drummer Adie moved to Wales, he’s in Southampton now.  It made it very difficult we tried with the early advent of internet to rehearse on line.  We still haven’t ruled out doing anything like that.  We spoke about it last year, I don’t think there was an official split in the band, there was point where we said “I hate you” – there was none of that. We’re still good mates and we did speak about doing an ep last year but time has kept us away from one another as it does as you get a bit older.  I would watch this space as I ain’t ruled it fully out

 

How come the switch to playing acoustic? Was it a big deal for you? How did it go down initially?

I didn’t really notice it, I spent 18 months not picking up a guitar at all, I didn’t think I’d do it again and then songs started coming and I got itchy feet and started again.  I think that 18 months meant that people had gone to look at something else so when I came back there wasn’t any what are you doing it like this for. I didn’t have that, people seemed to accept it for what it was, the punkier elements ignored it and went off listening to something else and I carried a few with me but the rest of it is just new.  I didn’t make a big play of reaching out to our old mailing list I just thought people would join me if they wanted to I’m not gonna beg them to come , it’s up to them whether they follow me or not.  It wasn’t sticking two fingers up at anybody it’s just that I thought if I’m doing something completely different I can’t expect everybody to follow me so I’ll leave it up to them

 

Do you get people coming to see you know who know you from your previous background?

Yeah I do, you get the odd person going “Blimey” and I’ve reached out a stage where the sons and daughters of some of the old fans thinking I’m some sort of legend which is very flattering but it just highlights how old I am

 

Before we go into solo stuff what about family life? You were in a band, what about your domestic situation? How does that fit in to what you’re doing musically, time wise – not just your spare time but you’ve a commitment to other people

It kind of fell into place accidentally I’ve got a very understanding wife, I’ve got a job fixing washing machines so I spend an awful lot of time on my own in the van, so that’s head time and from a songwriting point of view that’s perfect. I’m a songwriter 4 hours per day and I mend washing machines when I stop driving.  In all honesty I found the lack of time liberating because I have to do that in that ten minutes or this in this 15 minutes, I found amazing as it suits the way my brain works whereas before we’d just be sitting around, should we have a rehearsal or not with the band, now I’m like “I have to do it in that time because it’s the only time I’ve got” and for me it’s bish bash bosh, that’s how I work, that’s how my brain’s worked and I think if I look back over the years of being in a band was the most frustrating part of it.  My head worked faster than the band was able to.  I’m not going to say they were holding me back or anything as stupid as that but the way that a band works is much slower.  As a solo performer you can say I’m gonna rehearse this I’m gonna try this and if it don’t work it’s only taking me ten minutes, for a band to cut that up it might have taken a week before you throw that out.  Getting your ideas across to other people and having to slightly compromise the way you originally wrote it in order to accommodate that. All that costs time only to find that eventually it’s no good any more. Now I can try stuff and bin it, I can work much quicker and more prolific even though I’ve got much less time.

 

Now though the fact is that bills have to be paid.  Does that have any implications for your music or what gigs you can play?

No, I’ve gone about it logically.  The mistakes that were made in Lithium Joe I’ve not repeated. I didn’t create  a centre, I didn’t start off as part of a scene and do all my gigs as part of my home town, I started playing them here there and everywhere and as word got around I was ok at it if anyone asked me to go a little bit further away they offered me my diesel money.  It has spread out organically whereas with Lithium Joe it was like we will do a gig in Birmingham, we’ll do a gig in Carlisle. There was no logic to it, we were sporadically taking what we could get and it was costing us a fortune.  I sort of learned from that and I’ve grown outwards.  The gigs pay for themselves and my job pays for my bills and never the twain shall meet kind of thing.  I wouldn’t like to make a living out of being a singer though. It’s like a hobby that pays for itself

 Do you get to gig much?

About 5-7 a month depending on what I’m asked to do.  I’m out there more than we were in the band.  Social media being such an amazing thing, if we’d have had that back in lithium Joe days who knows what we could have done?  It’s such a leveler when it comes to getting word out there.  If you’ve got a way of communicating that people latch on to then you can speak to quite a lot of people every day and get the word out.  It’s terrible thing in the wrong hands but used correctly it’s brilliant.

 

It’s been a great way to push your solo records.  How many of these have you done?

I think it’s 13 with 14 on the way, I’ve lost count.  5 I did diy, burned them on the pc, photocopied some sleeves and banged them out for a quid.  Then I thought hang on that’s just paying for themselves, if I charge 2 or 3 quid I can save up to them properly, I did 5 like that. The next cd will be my tenth cellophane wrapped official cd that looks like other peoples cd.  I try and do one a year

 

Have you tried to get distribution?

I’ve got four dogs music who are really good, they’ve taken a handful.  The rest is all done on social media sites and word of mouth and gigs.  It’s proper diy, it might not be the old black and white photocopied sleeves but it’s as diy as you can get.  There’s nobody pushing it, no-one milking you for money it’s just me and my songs and wherever you can get them.

2004 was first Joe Solo album so 15 in 11 years.  It will slowdown naturally but while my brain was buzzing and the songs were coming I thought I might as well get them out there. You’re a long time thinking to yourself “wow, I could have made that record”

Now the inevitable question. Wso? What’s the raisin d’être?

The day after the UK election I was on face book and it was wall to wall slagging off and complaining and bitching and I thought we’ve called the Tories names for five years and all it’s gone and got us is another Tory govt so clearly it’s not the answer is it? So I thought what can we do that’s positive? I was sending messages out for most of the day saying now is the time to build not to moan quoting Joe Hill “Don’t moan, organise”. Stephen Goodall from Widness and I did a food bank gig together last year and he commented on one of the threads saying ‘what we need is a night of musical defiance all over the country’ and I thought this is possible as we’ve enough contacts between us.  So we decided on it and gave it a name and picked a weekend October 2-4.  We sent the idea out to the world, contacted every left leaning musician and venue we knew and it has gone boom.  Within a week we were going ‘oh my god this is massive ‘and it’s carried on from there.

 

It is gathering momentum? Has it inspired you?

There is a positive version of when you get yourself into a vicious circle, a downward spiral – the more energy you put in the more you get back out and we’re thinking oh my god look how far we’ve come.  It was hammered home today when Everton Football Club get involved, it’s incredible.  Couldn’t have dreamed of that in the first week of May when everyone was sulking after the election. The distance we’ve come in that time is incredible.  We’ve tapped into a need; people have to do something positive about it.  I know lots of political activists and it’s almost like they burn themselves out with the shouting.  They go on an A-B march in London and there’s a catharsis of waving a banner and shouting.  Then they come back home and sulk again.  There’s no real positivity comes out of that, we are bemoaning the people who aren’t making the changes and yet going back into the same old status quo afterwards.  It’s not enough to just do that, on the one hand we wanna hold a placard and the other we want to hold out a hand.  We want to both highlight the things that are wrong and try and do something about it in our own small way while we are at it.  I think there’s a need for people to do something creative, something positive that the idea has tapped into. It was a complete accident, I didn’t realise it was there but clearly it is.  It’s wonderful to see and inspiring in return.

 

People are happy to get involved.  Have you found that people are still looking for a hierarchy as that seems to be the stumbling block here?

There’s definitely some of that.  The Jeremy Corbyn thing with labour over here, you can see people’s energy being put towards that with more hope.  Without being too cynical and I do hope we get a more leftwing voice in mainstream politics really the higher you build these people up the higher they fall.  The state compromises these people, the whole system compromises them.  A pure idea can get bashed around to nothingness.  It’s that whole 1984 thing “If there’s hope it lies with the proles”, there’s something in that.  It’s we who are gonna change the world, it’s not them.  It’s us by saying we create a new society, a new way of thinking and they have to reflect that.  They have to move with what we do, we don’t have to be dictated downwards. We change it.  That’s what it’s about.

 Has it become too much of a chore? It must take up huge amount if your time

It’s not a chore; it’s just squeezing it into the time I’ve got so I’ve had to move things away.  I’ve been doing a bit less rehearsing and seeing less of the wife and kids.  I owe them an awful lot of Daddy time after October 4.  It’s never a chore; it’s got that natural ebb and flow to it as it moves forward. You take some disappointments with the good stuff.  Being at the centre of it all it’s very hard to see the big picture, I take my inspiration from the feedback I get rather than what I’m doing myself.  I’m snowed under with the beurocracy of it and I’ve got the gigs at the weekend.  I probably won’t see it for what it is until it’s been.  I know that I think exceptionally independently. I’m not looking to join anything else; I’m not looking to make a name for myself or my fortune.  I trust myself to steer it straight and the other guys in WSO think the same.  We are a campaigning group we are not an institution we are not part of that system. We wanna work to help and not just be another voice in the mainstream.

 

Any time for your own music

I’ve got an album coming about the 1984/85 miners strike.  I’m mastering that on the Tuesday after We Shall Overcome.

Have you told your family?

It’ll only be a day.  I think my last gig of the year is end of November and I won’t be back out again til February so I’ll get a couple of months with them.

It was pretty much written when We Shall Overcome took over so I’ve been phenomenon ally lucky in that respect. I almost had it ready and I’ve slowed things down. I may slip back from an album every year to 18-24 months but there’s no need for an album a year, I just set that target because it kept me going, kept me fighting towards something rather than getting sluggish and bogged down and thinking “I’ll do that tomorrow”.  If I have to have a record written by October then I can do that.  If We Shall Overcome continues as a going concern which I hope it will do, I think the musical output will slow down but on the other hand…..maybe not.  I just love it; it gives you a fresh perspective so there’s something new to write about. It’s not so much the writing of the songs or their inspiration; it’s the mechanics of actually getting in there and recording them that might slow down.  There won’t be an end point, not until I can’t do it anymore or my voice gives up or my hands don’t work.

 

Maybe a deep breath on October 5 and say how did that happen.

Either that or I’ll be arrested!!!!! It is properly magical to see how much we’ve got going on out there and how excited people are by it.

 niallhope

Cilla Black RIP

I recently watched the 3-part mini-series on that recently departed icon of British televison, Cilla Black. A few things really struck me.

The sectarian division in 1960s Liverpool. Frequent references were made to tensions between Protestants and Catholics…some of this may have been added for dramatic purposes,yet  the programme certainly gave the impression that some parents were anxious to keep their offspring from dating across religious lines. At one stage, Cilla’s dad tells her boyfriend to tell her aunties that he ‘supports Everton’ a cultural code for being Catholic at the time.

The role of the manager in popular music. This always fascinates me, and here we saw two really different types of manager: (i) the remote, well-heeled and well-connected manager, Brian Epstein (also manager of the Beatles) and (ii) the loyal, caring, supportive local lad without any resources apart from his passion and belief. In this case, the latter, Bobby Willis went on to be Cilla’s tour-manager and subsequently her husband until his death. Naturally both of these characters were played in a way that accentuated their different motives/styles/appraoches…yet it was still interesting to see how decisions were made behind-the-scenes in the music industry.

It was particularly poignant that when Epstein’s body was found, a contract with the BBC for a series with Cilla was amongst his possessions…and I seem to remember his character urging her to consider making a transition from being a pop star to being a TV personailty. Timing is everything in the music industry, and vision doesn’t hinder progress…yet at times the role of good old fashioned luck can’t be ruled out.

I hadn’t thought about Epstein outside of his role with the Beatles. I think it is fair to say that he single-handledly transformed not only the music industry, but also British, and subsequently, world culture. No band had been as big as that before, and while he made mistakes, many of those stemmed from the uncharted terrain he was exploring. Literally, no one had expected, or could have predicted the success of the band and what that entailed.

Yet ultimately, Epstein was apparently a tragic figure, a closet gay man during a time in Britain when that was not tolerated. It is tempting to comtemplate what he would have achieved if he had lived longer and more happily.

Another interesting thing about the series is that Cilla didn’t exactly come out of it well. She was porrtayed as a selfish, self-centred diva…although how would anyone of her age in that era have reacted to sudden massive fame and all that comes with that.

I think the end credits claimed that she went on to be Britian’s highest paid TV personality of her era…in which case that transition from being a pop star to being a TV personaility worked out really well for her.

It is a tribute to the series that it portrayed these characters as flawed yet made the viewer care for that and wish them well.

Another pop music story that was not without its tragedy and casualties….lots to learn from it.

I came across this footage of her wedding. Funny to think of a time when a celebrity wedding didn’t involve exclusive pictures for Hello magazine and aunts (or the Weird Hat Association of Knotty Ash) and relatives got to stand beside and behind the happy couple…now they would be firmly moved out of the way to accomodate Z-List celebrities!

http://www.britishpathe.com/video/cilla-blacks-wedding

Sheridan Smith who was superb as Cilla…with the real Cilla below

and a link to some relevant sites

http://www.bbc.co.uk/music/artists/e002853b-7843-449b-a46a-c35fe6b8bed5

This weeks news – August 17

Round Up – August 17

The post Rebellion blues really kick in I reflect on last weekends festival and get saving for 2016.

The Temples festival intial line up for 2016 has been revealed.
FIRST BANDS ANNOUNCED FOR JUNE 2ND-5TH, INCLUDING ALL PIGS MUST DIE, BONGRIPPER, DRAGGED INTO SUNLIGHT, GROUNDHOGS AND WEEKEND NACHOS. It has that novel feel in that location hasn’t been announced yet more news here

Dischord Records has always been a label close to my heart. I dj’d a couple of weeks ago at the post Salad Days screening in Dublin’s IFI but the label is continuing to go from strength to strength. Lungfis, Jawbox and Bikini Kill records have all be remastered for release and the Zomes album (featuring Asa from Lungfish) has just been released. More news here

A couple of fanzines made it to me this week. Blackpool Rox II *10 – Blackpool Rox Towers, c/o 16 Windmill Close, Blackpool, FY3 OEB, UK ; andy@jsntgm.com and Suspect Device *56 http://www.suspectdevice.co.uk suspectdevicehq@gmail.com
Both are great reads and a give a strong background to the current diy punk scene.

Damaged Goods are as active as ever. Cyanide Pills and Johnny Moped played rebellion last week. Johnny Moped are back with their first 7″ since 1978! It’s a double A-side of ‘Ain’t No Rock N Roll Rookie’ and ‘Super Woofa’, it will be followed by their new album sometime in late 2015 or early 2016.
The label is home to Wild Billy Childish whose CMTF Die interstoisser Traverse Ltd was originally available on a limited double 10” courtesy of Squoodge Records of Germany, these songs were released to mark Billy’s exhibition “Darkness was here yesterday” at the Carl Freedman Gallery in London back in 2013. They released a hand-stamped mail-order only CD version at the time but now have some lovely 12″ vinyl LP copies. On a choice of colours – green, clear or orange. Each is limited to 180 copies

Holly Golightly will have a new single and album out towards the end of this month (August)

Make That A Take Records is a prolific underground label based in Sctoland, organisers of book yer ane fest and write yer ane zine these are the true epitomoy of do it yourself. The latest relase is a compilation benefit for cancer awareness “Songs For Mum” and has songs by Bear Trade, The CutUps, LaChance and the Murderburgers amongst others

The kickstarter campain for Dunstan Bruce, from Chumbawamba’s I Get Knocked Down movie is now complete. Dunstan has raised the €40,000 required. Now the real work starts

This weeks Pledge of the week is for the Membranes . The band have just released their first album in over 20 years and are planning to release a remix album. The whole of the acclaimed Dark Matter/Dark Energy album is being remixed by the likes of Einsturzende Neubauten, Bad Seeds, The Pop Group , Therapy , Youth from Killing Joke and many
others. To release it they have set up a pledge with some unique things on it…you can either remix a track, get the membranes to play a gig in your house or get a guided tour of your town or just pre order the album – or many other things

Gig News
deerhoffgig

Deerhoff are “Highly revered indie rockers from San Francisco who play fractured, whimsical noise pop with an avant-garde edge.” or so Skinny WOlves so who are putting on their gig in Whelans on the 19th August Also playing on the night are So Cow

Feature Gig

In November 2005, Limerick, Ireland, duo giveamanakick unleashed We Are The Way Forward. It was their second album. It came out on CD. It was not available on iTunes. Spotify did not exist. The album received a fair share of acclaim at the time for its swashbuckling assault on the senses (in a good way). Rock critics fawned over it, saying stuff like:
“We Are The Way Forward combines the ugliness of brute force with the beauty of invention…A classic” 9/10 – Hot Press

“We Are the Way Forward will surprise you with its knockabout skills, unlikely hooks and wild sense of abandon… A ton of fun”, 4/5. – The Irish Times

“A big two fingers up to the world… without a doubt the best band in Ireland right now. There really is no competition. We Are The Way Forward is just that.” – Limerick Leader

Because it sounds good to say so, and because it’s kind of true, the album garnered cult status in the years that followed, and became a firm fan favourite. giveamanakeith and steveamanakick travelled up and down the country, played with a host of musical luminaries (there were loads, can’t remember ’em all), and toured across Europe, Canada, and USA.

gamak sadly called it a day in 2009, playing a one-off show in 2013 to mark their former label Out On A Limb Records’ tenth birthday party.
This is all useful information because to mark the tenth anniversary of We Are The Way Forward, giveamanakick are getting back together to perform the album in its entirety this autumn. Four gigs will happen. No more, no less.
Go see them at Roisin Dubh, Galway (September 24th), Dolans, Limerick (September 26th), Whelans,

Dublin (October 10th) and De Barras, Clonakilty (October 23rd). Special guests for all these shows is turntablist/production hero of the west, Naive Ted.

To celebrate this news, Out On A Limb Records will be releasing We Are The Way Forward for the first time ever on a very Limited Edition 180grm Heavyweight Vinyl LP, which can now be pre-ordered A
href=”http://outonalimbrecords.bigcartel.com/product/giveamanakick-we-are-the-way-forward-lp”> here
If for some bizarre reason you have never actually heard the album, take some vegan ice cream out of the freezer, sit back and listen to it here

THOSE DATES AGAIN:

Roisin Dubh, Galway (September 24th)

Dolans, Limerick (September 26th)

Whelans, Dublin (October 10th)

De Barras, Clonakilty (October 23rd)

niallhope

Damaged Goods to release Johnny Moped new single

Ok it’s nostalgia time, with Rebellion festival, Neurosis celebrating thirty years and no news that Johnny Moped will release their first record in over 20 years, on Damaged Goods records.

johnnymoped
It’s a double A-side of ‘Ain’t No Rock N Roll Rookie’ and ‘Super Woofa’ and is out now! It’s will be followed later in the year by their new, long awaited album.

The band are currently back in the studio putting the finishing touches to their new album, their first since 1990’s ‘The Search For Xerxes’ and it’s the original line up of Johnny, Slimy Toad, Dave Berk plus Rock N Roll Robot and Jacko Pistorious.

more info from here

niallhope

Neurosis announce 30 year anniversary gigs

Neurosis: 30th Anniversary Shows In San Francisco & Roadburn Announced;

Through Silver In Blood And Times Of Grace Vinyl Reissues Confirmed

25 years since they played Dublin for the first time Neurosis has just announced the band’s plans to celebrate three full decades together with their fans on two continents in early 2016, including shows in their native Bay Area and at Roadburn Festival in The Netherlands. Additionally, the band will release deluxe vinyl reissues of two of their most revered and long out-of-print titles; Through Silver In Blood and Times Of Grace.

As the band passes the thirty-year mark this Winter, Neurosis will celebrate this milestone with two stateside performances on March 4th and 5th at the Regency Ballroom, and then two more sets on April 16th and 17th headlining the massive Roadburn. At these four very special performances, the band will deliver material spanning their entire recorded lineage, from 1987’s Pain Of Mind through 2012’s Honor Found In Decay, with varied set lists at each event. These sets will span the band’s entire career, showcasing Neurosis’ comprehensive evolution from their primitive beginnings to the seminal, epic outfit they are today, as the band’s ever evolving, sonic palette has become a template for underground music over the last three decades, and resists genre classification.

Additionally, Neurosis will have two of their most revered and long out-of-print titles reissued on super deluxe 180-gram double vinyl this Autumn. Through Silver in Blood (1996), which Fact Magazine recently deemed the #1 best post-metal album of all time, has not been printed on vinyl in ten years, while Times Of Grace (1999) is seeing its first pressing in over fifteen years. Additionally, Grace, the 1999 Tribes of Neurot companion piece to Times Of Grace, will also see a deluxe reissue, its first time ever on vinyl. Each reissue will contain reinterpretations of the original iconic artwork, will be housed in heavy duty “tip-on” jackets and will be available in a variety of limited edition exclusive colours. The reissues are set for worldwide release on September 4th and will also include full album digital download codes. Preorders for the reissues are now available directly through Neurosis’ own Neurot Recordings.

Neurosis is currently on tour in North America, their biggest tour since the turn of the millennium which sees them playing in cities and states which they have not visited since the time of that Branstormers gig in Dublin in the 1990s, and also playing are labelmates Brothers Of The Sonic Cloth (featuring Tad Doyle of TAD and Hog Molly) for the entire trek,

http://www.neurosis.com
http://www.facebook.com/ officialneurosis
http://www.twitter.com/ neurosisoakland
http://www.neurotrecordings. com
http://www.facebook.com/ neurotrecordings

Temples Festival 2016

TEMPLES FESTIVAL 2016:
FIRST BANDS ANNOUNCED FOR JUNE 2ND-5TH, INCLUDING ALL PIGS MUST DIE, BONGRIPPER, DRAGGED INTO SUNLIGHT, GROUNDHOGS AND WEEKEND NACHOS

Temples Festival enters its triumphant third year, after two magnificent, sold-out editions that brought patrons in contact with some of the most revered artists operating in the spheres of extreme and heavy music. From the titanic international headliners (that have included Clutch, Converge, Earth, Electric Wizard, Neurosis, Pig Destroyer, SUNN O))) and Voivod) right down to the gritty native acts, there’s a strong sense of cohesion, community and celebration at Temples that evidently goes down a treat with heavy music lovers.

Three days of unforgettable appearances and high volume antics in the heart of Bristol are already set in stone for the dates of June 2nd-5th and with lessons learned, eardrums repaired, and justified excitement, we can announce the following eighteen acts for the highly anticipated Temples 2016…

ALL PIGS MUST DIE
ARABROT
BONGRIPPER
CORRUPT MORAL ALTAR
DEAD CONGREGATION
DRAGGED INTO SUNLIGHT
ESOTERIC
GNAW THEIR TONGUES
GROUNDHOGS
IRON REAGAN
MGLA
PISSGRAVE
SHEER TERROR
URFAUST
VENOM PRISON
VICTIMS
VISION OF DISORDER
WEEKEND NACHOS

With much more to be announced, including the three main-stage headliners as well as a vast array of bands from the international heavy underground, the countdown begins for Temples 2016…

Tickets are available exclusively through www.templesfestival.co.uk, and day tickets will become available as individual day splits are announced.

SOME PRAISE FOR TEMPLES 2015:

“Temples, not just a place, but a state of mind… The mecca of all things heavy and experimental.” – TEAM ROCK

“Temples is fast becoming not just a highlight of the festival season but a necessary pilgrimage.” – METAL HAMMER

“The organisers deserve much applause for their bill they’ve put together this year, straddling heavyweights from as broad a selection of genres that anyone could wish for at a UK festival.” – ZERO TOLERANCE

“Temples 2015 was another huge success for a rapidly expanding behemoth of a festival, and some minor niggles with delays couldn’t change that. Well-organised, well-programmed, and with that line-up, the devoted hordes went home fully sated yet baying for more. They’ll come roaring back next year, and for many years to come.” – CRACK MAGAZINE

“Expect great things, after all, third time’s a charm and the first two attempts have been nothing short of extraordinary.” – MUSIC OMH

“Temples has built a solid reputation as one of the world’s ‘must go to’ heavy music festivals… It’s hard to conceive how a festival so young in its infancy can be so ‘on the money’ in every respect – and yet that is exactly what Temples Festival is.” – LOUDER THAN WAR

“Yet again, Temples has proven itself to be one of the most successful heavy music festivals in the UK right now – not only with a non-stop awesome line up, but with a well maintained atmosphere that cannot be faulted.” – ECHOES AND DUST

“All hell broke loose at this year’s Temples Festival… You can see that this festival is one of the best happening in the UK right now.” – CVLT NATION

“Violence, vitriol, volume – Bristol bends at the altar of the UK’s heaviest festival.” – KERRANG!

www.templesfestival.co.uk
www.facebook.com/TemplesFestival
twitter.com/templesfestival
instagram.com/templesfestival

Dischord Latest News

dischord

Dischord Records Newsletter: August 2015
OUT NOW
· Lungfish “Pass and Stow”
Pass and Stow is the third full-length from Baltimore, Maryland’s Lungfish. First released in 1994, the record was last pressed to vinyl in 2010. This latest version has been remastered and recut from the source files by Bob Weston at Chicago Mastering Service.
NOW AVAILABLE FOR PRE-ORDER
· Jawbox S/T
This fall Dischord and DeSoto will reissue Jawbox’s long out-of-print self-titled record on CD and LP. Recorded and mixed with John Agnello and released on TAG Recordings in 1996, this was the band’s fourth and final full-length. For this reissue the vinyl has been remastered by Dan Coutant at Sunroom Audio. Both CD and LP versions will include updated cover art courtesy of Jason Farrell.
Jawbox’s S/T is out September 22 and is available for pre-order now.
· Bikini Kill “Revolution Girl Style Now”
Recorded by Pat Maley in Olympia, WA and self-released by the band in 1991, Revolution Girl Style Now was Bikini Kill’s original demo tape. This fall, Bikini Kill records will reissue the cassette on CD and LP. This version has been remixed by Guy Picciotto and mastered by John Golden and will include three unreleased tracks — “Ocean Song,” “Just Once,” and “Playground.”
The band has made a trailer for the record featuring footage from its first show in Olympia, WA, which was shot by Brian Ruff and edited by Kathleen Hanna & Kathi Wilcox. Watch the video here.
Revolution Girl Style now will be out September 22 and is available for pre-order now.

RECENT DISCHORD AND DISTRIBUTED RELEASES
· Zomes “Near Unison”
Near Unison is the new album from Zomes, a Baltimore and Stockholm-based duo that features Asa Osborne (Lungfish) and Hanna Olivegren. These songs come from a year long musical sketch-sharing practice that led the band towards simple compositions inspired by the melodies and intimate storytelling of Swedish and American folk music.
Recorded by the band and Craig Bowen in Baltimore during the fall of 2014, the LP is out via Zomes’ own label (also called Near Unison) and is available digitally via the duo’s Bandcamp page as well as the Dischord website.
Watch a video for the song “Beckoning Breeze” here.
· “Banned in DC” Back in Print
After nearly 10 years out of production, Banned In DC is back in print. Assembled by Cynthia Connolly, Leslie Clague, and Sharon Cheslow and originally released in December of 1988, the book collects hundreds of photos, flyers, and stories documenting the DC punk scene of the mid-’80s.
The intention of the book – one of the first to be published on punk in the US – was to capture the feeling and energy of the movement, using stories from the people who were involved. Images of many of the bands of that time can be found in this book: Minor Threat, Faith, Marginal Man, Scream, Red C, Bad Brains, Rites of Spring, Nuclear Crayons, Insurrection, Hate from Ignorance, G.I., Void, Second Wind, and more.
· Bikini Kill “The First Two Records”
The First Two Records compiles Bikini Kill’s S/T and Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah vinyl reissues onto a single CD.
Originally released in 1992, the self-titled EP is comprised of four songs recorded by Ian MacKaye at Inner Ear Studios; one song from the band’s 1991 demo cassette; and one song recorded during Bikini Kill’s live performance April 4th, 1992 at Washington, DC’s Sanctuary Theater. Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah was originally released in 1993 as the BK side of a split with the UK’s Huggy Bear. On this version, Huggy Bear’s b-side tracks have been replaced with seven previously unreleased songs that were either recorded live at shows or at Bikini Kill practices during that era.

Strange Wilds – Subjective Concepts lp

Strange Wilds
Subjective Concepts
Sub Pop

strangewilds

It’s amazing how few members are required to be in a band to make an unholy racket. There’s three in Strange Wilds and have a force to be reckoned with. Pounding drums behind a solid riff laden bassline with explosive rock guitars provide the background to vocals being screamed to be heard.

It’s a nirvana, holy rollers tool mix. Plenty of hair, plenty of heads bopping and lots of riffs. THis is the debut album from the Olympia based band. They are a self proclaimed power trio and that goes to a certain distance in explaining the sound.

It’s a sweat laden journey of dirty rock and roll with some Seaweed or Torche shining through. I haven’t really heard much of the term grunge in recent years and don’t want to make it seem that Strange WIlds are somehow retro in their playing. Throughout the 11 songs there are hints to the sound that defined Sub Pop and may bands from Seattle, close neighbours to Olympia. Whilst Olympia were looking to Kill Rock Stars, Seattle was creating them and Strange Wilds sound closer to their stately Washington neighbours in Seattle.

It’s not all grunge and power, tracks like Don’t Have to roll along at a slow pace but you just know the power is going to kick in and snarl

niallhope