Pete Holidai Interview


It is important for irish punk to be championed with all the other anniversaries this year. It is 40 years since the release of Ireland’s first punk record, on chiswick records, tv tube heart, The radiators from space were our trailblazers back then.  Chiswick imprint Ace records has just re-released that debut album so I sent guitarist Pete Holidai a few questions.  Pete is now in Trouble Pilgrims who will have a new album out soon.

pic by Paula Geraghty

You went to school in London? When did you come to ireland and how did you get over all the bodies heading in the other direction? How did you all meet and form the Radiators?

I was born in dublin a stone’s throw from Santry where Philip Chevron was born and raised, my family moved to London when I was four years old. I remained there throughout the 60s until the family returned to ireland in 1972. Not long after I returned I met Steve who work in a record shop in liffey street, he approached me when i went into the shop and he asked me if i wanted to be in a band…a few years later in ’75 [ i had returned to london on my own for a few years] we got serious about forming a high energy band and after we met philip, jimmy and mark the band got up and running

The band  moved to London after a couple of years, what was the motivation behind that?

Eamon carr and Jackie Hayden paid for some demoes that were pitched to chiswick records in london, they came over and saw us live and offered us a singles deal with the option of and album which they proceeded with. We went to London to promote the release of tv tube heart [tv screen and enemies had already been released in the uk] we stayed there for five years!!!

How did the first reunion come about? I was at that Hawkins House gig and it was a special event. Do you remember much about it ?

We were approached by gha [gay health action] an aids awareness group and were asked to reform for one night only to raise awareness and funds for the group. the supporting cast included the Real Wild West and Gavin Friday, it was a sold out event. A ltd edition cassette (Dollar for your dreams) was also released by Comet Records

Had you any idea how important and relevant to many people under Clery’s clock was? Or was it just a great song for you?

I think I quickly realised how personal the song was to Philip, so it was a rare occasion he was willing reveal deeper feelings to the public, I always thought of it as a most beautiful love song that just happened to be about same sex relationships. It is a timeless masterpiece [as are most of our songs lol]

So 40 years ago what would young pete holidai make of a band rereleasing an album from 1937?

No problems with that if the content has retained some relevance, in fact I’m a big fan of the great writers from that era such as George Gershwin, Irving Berlin et al, plus being turned on to Brecht and Weill by phil.

How did it all come about? Any chance of a radiators gig to celebrate its release?

Roger armstrong [who produced tvth] is a director at ace, who evolved from chiswick in the eighties, decided he would like to release an expanded 40th ed of the album, steve and i contributed in terms of the artwork and final selection of the additional tracks. There is no chance of a radiators gig without philip [or steve or me]

What’s happening with Trouble Pilgrims? Gig wise and releases?

Trouble pilgrims have just finished recording their debut album “dark shadows and rust” we are currently discussing and negotiating a worldwide manufacturing and distribution deal

After the electric picnic we will be looking towards a high profile launch gig -watch this space-

What’s happening with Loom records? What’s the plan for it?

I will be producing a series of releases over the next few months featuring emerging talent, the plan is to record and album in a day unplugged and solo!!!

You still talk about music daily, play it and are involved. What gives you that inspiration?

It’s such an integral part of my life and I feel I still have things to say and do, I’m writing the best songs of my life at the moment…I’m driven by the world around me life produces a huge range of emotions that fuels inspiration

You can organise your own talk at electric picnic  what 5 people would you ask and why?

Paul McGuinness, Roddy Doyle, Eamon Carr, Abner Brown AND Steve Rapid

SUBJECT: DIGITAL WAS THE DEATH OF REAL MUSIC DISCUSS

niallhope

GRIT interview

pic by David Pujol

Dublin Oi Punk DIY band Grit have been doing the rounds for over a year now.  Their fast snappy tunes almost coming across like an Oi X Ray Spex at times have seen the light of day on vinyl a couple of times on Distro-y-records.  They are a feature of the DIY scene throughout Ireland and have toured Europe too.  I sent their lead singer Clodagh a few questions and here are her words.

Can you give me some history of the band?

The five of us know each other from the Dublin punk scene and have played in bands together before.  Byrneos (bassist), Eric (guitarist) and John (drums) always wanted to do an Oi! style band but it took some years before they got into a room together with instruments in their hands instead of pint glasses!  They had a few casual jams and decided the tunes were worth making public.  Seán came on board with a second guitar and then myself on vocals.  We had our first practise as a 5 piece in June 2016, our first gig on the 1st July in the Grangegorman Squat complex.  Since then we have been busy: released two 7”s and gigged in Ireland, UK, France, Basque Country and Spain with more gigs in U.K. and Germany to come in 2017.

What gives you the fuel to keep wanting to sing and play songs?

The fuel and drive is that I’m still excited about the punk scene and live music.  I want to participate in the Irish scene, I also enjoy travelling and seeing how the punks do things abroad.

I wanted to be in this band because I am partial to the oi! genre – current bands like Bishops Green, Rude Pride, The Jollars, Syndrome 81,  as well as older staples such as Runnin’ Riot and Camera Silens.  In the early days of GRIT there wasn’t any Irish oi!-punk bands playing the particular French-inspired type of music that we do and none with a vocal viewpoint coming from someone other than, ahem, a cis white male, so that was the stimulus that drove me to approach the lads about doing vocals in GRIT – no-one else doing what I was interested in listening to.

(R.A.Z.O.R. with a more uk-inspired sound formed around the same time as us and are worth checking out!)

You’re the front person. Does singing songs give a sense of confidence that otherwise just wouldn’t be there? Why do you think that is?

For me, feeling comfortable or confident in myself was something that instead came with age and learning not to undermine myself with negative thoughts.  If I give the impression that I’m confident on stage it’s because I am at ease with the lads and enjoying myself.

Who writes the words? What are you trying to portray with your lyrics?

Mostly myself and/or Eric, however, Back up Loader is all the boot-iful poetry of John.

Our songs’ subject matter reflects that of the traditional punk and oi! canon but portrayed or interpreted through our individual experiences of living in Ireland.  Some of the topics we have tackled are: austerity politics, class struggle, the decline of the Irish small town, dysfunctional relationships, mental health, friendship.

We try to have a defiant tone, I hope that although some of the subject matter may be bleak you will still feel optimistic about the future when you listen.

Do you think there is a class struggle in the western world?  What do you think the term working class represents in Ireland?

Yeah, I believe there is a class struggle and there will be as long as capitalism exists.  Top-down stuff like austerity politics, zero-hour contracts, gentrification* and bottom-up movements like people mobilising against water charges, going out on strike. *Earlier this Summer on tour with the band, almost everywhere we visited had a version of the scenario… this venue/this neighbourhood/my home won’t be here much longer.

It’s a tricky term to define … the working class doesn’t look the same way as it did, for example, forty years ago because of the changing landscape of employment.  Experiences vary depending on the environment (i.e. city versus rural communities).  A lot of traditional working class people are now long term unemployed or the working poor.  There’s also the consideration of what is economically versus culturally working class, who is middle-class aspirational and who has class consciousness.  I don’t have the terms to answer adequately … it’s more a gut feeling.

GRIT are a lot different in sound to your last band (Burnchurch). Did you purposely set out to form such a band? Any reason?

It was most definitely a conscious decision.  The other members and I have played in heavy bands before and wanted to try our hand at a different style.

All the band have deep roots in the DIY scene and have been for over 20 years. Has this DIY scene achieved much?  Is it a different space now compared to the mid to late 90s?

Although I don’t live there any more, I am still connected mostly to the Dublin DIY scene.  I think it has achieved lots and evolved over time.  The younger generations always seem to improve on what they have inherited,  I am continuously impressed by them.  Two achievements that stand out for me are:

The Karate Club – in existence ten years is a punk run practise space.  I know there are others like it in Dublin too.  A dedicated space enables more and more bands to form and creates a very healthy scene.

Tenterhooks –  were a formidable collective that rented a city centre space, kitted it out for concerts and put on regular events which was a refreshing alternative to pub venues.  It shut it’s doors in 2016.

In international terms,  cheap flights and the Internet has widened the web of the Irish punk scene as bands can hop on a plane and do a weekend tour anywhere in the EU quite easily.  The exchange of ideas and new links formed are a positive influence on us all.

It’s definitely a different space… some changes that jump out at me

– everyone has their own gear, so you don’t have to keep asking the one band who own a backline to play your gig! This can empower more folk to put on their own gigs: all they need is a room.

– as i recall Dublin in the 90s there were two scenes that sometimes merged… now there are several different diy punk scenes.

– more active women, openly queer folks, immigrant punks add diversity

One thing that hasn’t changed much is the price of gigs, some people appear to want to maintain door prices at mid to late 90s rates.  I’m not a bread head and no-one is ever going to be rich from playing punk gigs but a decent door price (e.g. €10 or more) would ensure no-one has to take a hit.

You’re driving a group of 10 year olds to their dance class and they ask you about music. What 5 songs do you play to give them an introduction to your world?

You drop them at dance class and have the deck to you and you only.  What 5 songs do you throw on?

Ha ha!! That’s an hilarious premise! And the answer could change daily.

I’m gonna just give you five dance-able punk songs instead.

I actually made a mix CD for my niece of a similar age and put some accessible punk tracks on it.  These were:

  1. Aggressors BC, Tone of the Times – punky ska/dirty reggae with social commentary
  2. Buzzcocks, Ever fallen in love? – bittersweet power-poppy punk
  3. Le Tigre, Let’s Run – positive lyrics about not being afraid to risk failure set to a dance track

To those three I would add:

  1. Hexen, Shame on us – melodic oi from Bilbao, I would cough over the cursing of course. I like the lyrics that warn of “false friendship, false rebellion” which are wise words for the younger generation coming up in ubiquitous social media.
  2. G.L.O.S.S. Outcast Stomp – after the other four songs i think the chisslers will be able to handle something kinda heavy and this is an absolute banger.

You’ve an interview coming up for a blog: What question do you hope you’re going to be asked and why? What question do you dread and why?

I always hope I will be asked questions that can help me promote the good things happening in the scene here because neither I nor GRIT exist in a vacuum.  I like when I’m asked for veggie recipes too because I’m wholesome.

I dread being asked “what’s it like being a woman in punk”.  Yawn.  Punk interviewers are way too intelligent and original to ask that though.

You played GGI festival (not your first time). What is so special about this festival?  Why should people go to it next year?

GGI is the Glasgow Groningen Ireland festival (established 2004), a rotating annual DIY fest that celebrates the friendships and connections between those scenes. This year had a great mix of approximately 40 bands: crust, d-beat, hardcore, kraut-space-punk, noise, ska, etc,. etc., playing over two days drawn from the above mentioned places (and beyond).

It’s unique because it has a completely different character every year depending on the location and the crew involved but always maintaining a DIY punk ethos.

In a sense, the festival’s impetus was a nostalgic one but it has become a self-fulfilling prophecy and now is a permanent fixture on many Irish punk’s calendar.  This year I was pleased to see the demographic widening – alongside the (supervised) toddlers who were pottering about during the afternoon, there were teenagers all the way up to folks in their 60s in attendance ( with bands of all ages too).

It will be in Groningen in 2018, the crew there run a well-organised festival in excellent venues and great after parties in the Crow Bar run by Esther (Fleas & Lice).  You can rent a bike and enjoy the flat bike routes of the city and whatever Dutch specialities you enjoy in the afternoon before the gigs – little beers with big heads and falafel would be mine.

niallhope

 

 

 

 

I Am A Carcrash Interview

 

The couple of times I’ve seen I am a car crash live have been challenging experiences. Definitely more post thank punk and angular rhythms aplenty but tunes sneaking in the back door. Once or twice I have been rocked from my comfort zone, unsure of where John is going with his lyrics. In anticipation of their new record coming out before the end of the year I sent him a few questions

For those interested can you give us a bit of history to band and some of the other bands you’ve played in?

Myself and j have been long time band mates after our last band lebowski disintegrated, I thought I’d never play again hated all of it and had nothing in me to say. But after few years I just started to write again. Felt the compulsion. Called jay and together we formed I am a Car Crash. Jay is the director. Shane is the keeper of my focus and together it’s a sound we love.

What is the connection with foad?

Peter jones saw us play early on and was instantly on board and a gigantic support. We’ve a lot of thanks owed to him

How many times have you played rebellion? What are your honest impressions of it? Did your opinion change after attending the festival?

This year was our second rebellion. We loved the whole thing. Last year was great too but this year we have the right people and got to play a bigger stage and I felt we lost ourselves in the set and did ourselves very proud. I’m no massive punk guy but there’s lots of artists there who I have huge respect for, paranoid visions, I had some good chats with Steve ignorant and what a fucking lyricist he is also our good buddies Protex and Lee Harvey’s are great company. I think my onstage self and our vibe is what the punk audience latch onto and I’ve no issue there. I’m ridiculously ethical when it comes to music so there that too.
But rebellion I loved the community of the punk crowd. That’s thing I’ve been struck by most, a love for music and for community

You’ve also done rocking Road festival. How did that come about?

Rocking road is a great cause that’s why we do that. My son goes to that school and to help in anyway is a privilege, the drummer dad David runs it everywhere and is a special guy so it’s a total pleasure.

If you had a limitless budget for your own rocking road festival what would be the line up (6 bands if you can)

Cure.
Gang of Four
Future of the left
Xtc
Whipping boy
Kaisier Chiefs cause they’d probably get onto the bill anyway somehow, they always do

Can you tell me your favourite gig a) to play and b) to see ?

Favourite gig? Well, I’d love to see future of the left live but I’d probably have to say sonic youth at electric picnic or pavement, a toss up. Favourite place to play? lots of great places round Dublin, fibbers can be great, Thomas house is nifty, Whelans.  But I’m looking forward to getting our album out and hitting far more stages.

What made you pick up an instrument to begin with and decide yes I can be in a band? What makes you keep doing it?

I always wanted a guitar. Before that I was just dancing round like a sap with a tennis racket in my room. Brothers and sisters used to catch me, now that’s embarrassing, I’d rather of got caught masturbating which I never did and don’t don’t do anyway cause I’m a born again catholic.
Started to jot words in sixth class just did. Never been able to explain it and it morphed. Got guitar at twelve and slowly slowly got better. Now it’s the same. I’m writing at various stages. I think I’m just a writer who happens to be in s band using a guitar I could put it down and use some other instrument which I’ve always thought would be interesting. It’s always unconscious what comes out there is. So yeah we don’t really sit down and say it needs to be this or that. We change structure about. Each one is its own thing so we never know what’s next. This album is I dunno dark, funny, loud, post punk, pixies smacking into talking heads but I’m told I’m bad at referencing us by the other two. But when this album is out we’ve no idea what they next thing we do will sound like.

We love doing it. Creating is the fun. We wanna up our output and this album is just the beginning. Everyone is writing and is everyone feels peak and it’s just a great fun outlet. I love playing live and I love being in the studio with this band.

Your sound is more based on angular rhythms rather than straightforward punk rock. Do you sit down and think, yes this has to sound a certain way or is it just the way it all flows

Again. The lads will tell ya. I know nothing of time signatures and beats and middle 8ths and all that. So ye the music just flows with the words. I may try throw a subject in but once it starts I’m not even in the equation then suddenly there’s a song and we hone it. That’s really it. We only have comparison to make with last ep ‘white people problems’ and it’s a million miles from that in a lot of ways. So we are just really really excited to finish and share it cause it hits everything in its nose. We are thinking of calling it Them Not Us but no definite yet.

We are hoping for the album to be out by the end of the year. It’s 80% there.  This album is just inspired by what I see around, everyone losing their humanity while speaking online, ridiculous presidents, identify politics, love, the limits being put on free speech, people’s belief in magic and conspiracies, unemployment all things I’ve seen and have got to me in someway or make me think we must be in a simulation cause this shit would only be happening if someone was just having a laugh. I hate left I hate right it’s hard to tell the difference some of the songs poke at that sad truth how they’ve both gone extreme and then meet, the horse shoe affect. Everything is a team, everything is worth digging in for, there’s many wars on but there’s definitely one on intelligence and reason taking place. Then the next song will be about a gym bunny or “what about building 7” which is one of my favourites cause it just hammers at the silliness of it all.

I’ve seeen you a couple of times and each times it seems like you are about to say something controversial. Is this done on purpose?

Nope. It’s the listener who decides if it’s controversial.
I just have fun and switch off it’s the same as writing. But I think most bands are so sterile now so we stand out but that’s more there thing. Outspoken I don’t even know what that means. We are just a band having fun it’s no big deal I think the majority at gigs get it and see what’s being done, thought it’s not always instantly obvious but isn’t there bigger pay off in that. I challenge and poke st subjects I care about but it’s always more fun to me to joke with it cause I always find that’s the best way.
But it depends on the mood some gigs I’d be very quiet ya never know with us

Do you use music to entertain or challenge?

Both I guess. Predominantly it’s us saying we like this so. So I would say I never think oh I’m gonna try challenge it’s more just a natural occurrence if that does happen but we don’t look for that, that’s easy and ultimately pointless I reckon. No matter what you do or say or don’t say or do, someone somewhere will be upset and all good music should upset some people that’s the point of any meaningful art, blandness offends me and there’s plenty of that.

Entertain is also just an offshoot but never the point. The point is only to make music and to share it with others. Some we entertain some we bore as long as we aren’t referred to as nice band with nice songs, I’m ok. We can switch to most rock bands dressed in black pretending to be something important for the nice but packaged as unrulely hard rock.

Just out of interest were you going to punk gigs before playing in the band? Had you come across the diy scene in Dublin?

DIY never belonged to punk all the bands we were round when we started were putting out their own music. We played with many a punk band and we’ve played with many a band who call themselves some other descriptor. I’ve never felt the need to call us a punk band or a alternative band or a slow dance group that was the point of the band name I AM ACar Crash doesn’t make you think of a genre, The main reason I liked it. But for now we are 3 with guitars and drums so we are a rock band and then it’s up to everyone else to name us and I always enjoy hearing what people think, I hear a million different things after gigs always usually lovely even though I’m not the most comfortable person post show
So when we were younger there was that whole treasure island thing which was the pop punk thing I was aware of that I was aware of hating it to its core. I’ve never been a network guy or a click lover. If I really wanted I’d be out at gigs every night telling some little eager beaver scene band how great they are and trying to get an opener by use of felatio cause that’s what happens but I couldn’t be making eye contact with myself then. or we could water down our sound and try tick as many boxes most bands do that stuff. It’s very much business over art with most now. It’s like football, you look at some players and think, wait does that guy even like football at all.

Old band was called levowski so j and stu from that band went on to form Liz is evil our bassist works at golden plec and I just sunk into a bad state for a year or two I’d say doing nothing and love for nothing I always remember j telling me he thought I was done for overweight and in a mental crisis but one day it left or subsided and the need to write returned and hasn’t left since, it could do but there’s no point worrying about something. I will never understand. But you’d hope people find our brand of lark entertaining, we certainly do.

niallhope

Lee Harvey’s Interview

Dublin band the Lee Harvey’s have been on the go 8 years and in that time have released 3 albums on foad. I’ve seen them only a handful occasions but have always been impressed. Their sound has a feel not unlike those northern Irish bands on good vibrations but where good vibes had a lot of pop going on Lee Harvey’s are more rooted in clash and punk, lots of great melodies though. I’m sitting here listening to their Still Angry album on a plane journey back from Spain. I spend 7 days there on a family holiday and this was a perfect accompaniment for heading home. As I pondered going back to the real world and wondered what was going on in the world I had bitzy’s observations on the states in my ears. This album was written before the current President made claims for most powerful man in the world. No doubt that will provide fuel for rainforests of lyrics but the observation of

“It’s what you do that makes you count
Not who you serve”

is as deliberate as ever in the week white supremacists felt it was ok to March and then commit a terror attack. What will happen will become the history books of our children’s children, let’s hope it doesn’t repeat the mistakes of the past.

I sent Bitzy a few questions after their successful appearance at Rebellion and here is what he had to say.

For those interested can you give us a bit of history to a) the lee Harvey’s and b) some of the other bands you’ve played in? What do you do outside the band?

I formed The Lee Harveys in 2009 with Mike a guy from work who has gone back to New Zealand. I wanted it to be a sounding board about all things good and bad with the USA. It is a country full of contradictions…plenty of subject matter forever.

We did our first gig in Thomas House. Paul joined after that.

I was in The Strougers back in the 70’s and played the Dandelion market etc, Paul was in thee amazing colossal men, guernica and firewater creed. Tony was in jobseekers. We were a 3 piece for a long time until Rory joined on lead guitar

I work as an outreach worker with homeless drug users and people with alcohol issues

How did the three albums on FOAD come about? Who asked first and what does the process involve?

We recorded the first 2 albums in ashtown studios. PA and Whelo from the dubtones guested on guitar. basically PA said he would put the records out on FOAD which we were happy to do. Our current album is also on FOAD and fair play to them for helping us immensely. we sell cds at gigs basically. gun city is sold out and still angry is almost sold out so several hundred sales there.

how many times have you played rebellion? What are your honest impressions of it? Did your opinion change after attending the festival?

We’ve played rebellion 4 times. The first time is now part of folklore., too long to go into but I still have nightmares bout it. My impressions of rebellion are a very well oiled rock n roll machine. Its good to be rubbing shoulders with some of the punk rock legends, but there are some of the older bands from back in the day who seem happy to just play the circuit and not release anything new. Its a great festival run by great people.

can you tell me your favourite gig a) to play and b) to see ?

I loved playing with buzzcocks a few years back. rebellion, as i said, is great coz the sound ya get is second to none. Seeing the clash in TCD and Ramones 4 times was the ultimate.

what made you pick up an instrument to begin with and decide yes I can be in a band? What makes you keep doing it?

Punk happened at the right time for me, 1976, hearing new rose and seeing the radiators from space told me that anyone could do it, they were a great irish band. i do it for the love of music, not for money coz theres fuck all money in it and coz ive still got something to say.

we ain’t gonna ever play jazz, put it that way.

niallhope

Cathal Funge. An interview with the broadcaster Cathal about his punk radio documentary.

What can we expect from the documentary?

 

The documentary is going to be a bit of a trip back forty years to tell the story of Irish music in 1977. I’ll be covering quite a few events from that year including The Boomtown Rats and The Radiators From Space both releasing their debut singles, Rory Gallagher headlining the Macroom Mountain Dew Festival (Ireland’s first outdoor rock festival), Lizzy headlining Dalymount with The Rats and The Rads supporting, The Clash in Belfast and Dublin and the launch of Hotpress.

 

Were there any surprises for you as you delved into the scene at the time?

 

There was a lot of talk in the UK press over the last twelve months about the 40th anniversary of British punk so I started to look at what was happening in Ireland around that time. The initial idea was to look at the Irish punk scene but after a bit of research I noticed a lot of things started to happen at once and not just in Dublin but across the country, North and South.

 

1977 in Ireland seems to be a year of beginnings for a modern Irish music scene. You had bands like The Radiators getting into the charts, rock festivals in Macroom and Dublin, The Rats on Top of the Pops, a national music magazine launched etc. The documentary in many ways is about a bunch of people just going for it, creating new ways of doing things and setting the tone for others to follow, which off course they did.

 

If you compare today’s vibrant local music scene to 1977, it doesn’t just feel like a different era, it feels more like a different planet!

 

What do you make of those early punk ‘pioneers’?

I love the DIY attitude and lot of the music from that era has stood the test of time. A lot of the events I cover in the documentary are not punk but they were inspired by the spirit and energy of time. It seems as if the climate for change was ripe and people went for it. In the case of Macroom, it was just a bunch of people in a small West Cork town trying to bring some extra business into their area. They came up with the idea of staging Ireland’s first rock festival and managed to pull it off with Rory Gallagher headlining the event at a time in his career when he was playing venues like Shea Stadium, not the local GAA pitch in Macroom.

 

At the same time, up the road in Cork City, Elvera Bulter (now label boss at Reekus Records) was in UCC and she started putting on gigs in City Hall including Dr Feelgood and The Stranglers. By the end of the year she was hosting the weekly Downtown Kampus gigs at the Arcadia which quickly established itself as the focal point of a new music scene in the city. That scene blossomed in the 80’s and gave us great bands like Stump and Microdisney.

 

I’m sure they didn’t realise it at the time, but a lot of these people were pioneers. They didn’t just do things, they also showed that there was a market for rock music in Ireland.

 

How did you get into music (as a fan) in the first place?

 

Growing up in Wexford, there wasn’t much going on in terms of music, no record shops, no gigs etc. I was very fortunate that my dad and older brother both had great tastes in music. My dad had a lot of old 60’s albums that I soaked up and then as I got a little older, I would sneak into my brother’s bedroom and rob/borrow some of his albums. So, anything from Teenage Fanclub to Nirvana, Mercury Rev, Pixies, Sonic Youth.

 

Around that time, I got a part time job as a petrol pump attendant in a local garage, working a few evenings after school and during summer holidays. The garage was in the middle of the country side and I sat in a hut for about 5 hours with only a radio to keep me company. Dave Fanning suddenly became my best friend and his nightly show was an education, as was Donal Dineen’s show on Today FM.

 

 

Any particular punk songs/albums/gigs that really moved you?

 

From the late 70’s era, I particularly love Buzzcocks first five singles and I think The Clash’s debut album from ’77 sounds great forty years on. In the documentary, I talk to Paul Burgess from Belfast band Ruefrex and Jake Reilly from The Blades about The Clash’s visit to Ireland in October ’77. The Trinity gigs have gone down in local music folklore, how many bands formed after that night out with Strummer and his gang? On the flip side, up in Belfast the gig was cancelled which caused a mini riot and some claim is was the night that the Belfast punk scene was born. I think that might be stretching it a little but it is interesting to hear about the impact the visit one band had on music fans in two very different cities in October ’77.

Listen to the documentary here