May fest 2017

Hope Collective are delighted to be involved with Mayfest 2017. Mayfest is a celebration of Workers Clulture and is running nightly in Liberty Hall from May 1 to May 12.

Our event is on Tuesday May 2 with an event compered by Actor Bryan Murray. Joining Bryan will be Fran QUigle (booker of McGonagles in the 70’s), Smiley Bolger (Booked the New Inn and many others), Elvera Butler (Cork Promoter and main person behind Reekus Records). Peter Jones from Paranoid Visions, former Trinity College Ents Officer Edwina Forkin, the authrs of In Concert, Niall McGuirk and Michael Murphy. There will be guest appearances from Colm Walsh, Ken Duffy and Pete Holidai

All will be talking about their experiences in and around the music and punk scene in Dublin and ireland. It should be a fascinating evening as we continue to document what has gone before us.

Life But How To Live It, Dirt, Onion Breath, Female Hercules – Dublin 1993

LifeButHowToLiveIt

March 6 1993

Life But How To Live It, Dirt, Onion Breath, Female Hercules

Mulligans Bar

 

Not Our World, Keltic Konviction, Malicious Damage, Lawnmowers Dublin 1989

NotOurWorldFeb24

Feb 24 1989

Not Our World, Keltic Konviction,  Lawnmowers, (Malicious Damage added on the night)

Grattan

The two Not Our World gigs in the Grattan were full of incident. During the first one there was crowd trouble in the venue but, more worryingly, there was trouble   outside the second week. Timo played bass in Keltic Konviction. He later moved on to Shred, where he played with the Bearded lady and Shane (both from Not Our World  who then moved to Joan of Arse). The gig he mentions was chaotic. Some people came along just to cause a bit of havoc. This was familiar to gigs at the time. Abusive  heckling was a craze but the situation got out of control that night when a glass was thrown on stage .

Timo caught the brunt of it and finished his set with a  bloodied head. Thankfully no more glasses were thrown at Hope gigs and Timo had no interest in, or intention of pursing the matter legally (which has happened at other gigs where people have been injured). The second gig was, again, memorable for the wrong reasons. One of our friends had her handbag stolen outside. She ran  upstairs to the venue, visibly shaken. Deko and I went chasing instinctively. We didn’t find the culprit and Susanne was very upset. As organiser of the gig I felt  responsible but she got off better than Timo had the previous week.

Those gigs were turning points. Both attracted 150 people and through the trouble came about a wish for people to make things better. We wanted to be able to go to gigs in peace and not have to worry about safety. Through Not Our World (and then ‘Hope’) a policy was  made to encourage friendliness at gigs, let people see that they weren’t just there to be consumers, that they were at a gig to be part of something – something they could find comfort in and something they could be comfortable with. That became the plan, the “hope”.

We Shall Overcome benefit Paranoid Visions, I AM A Carcrash. Checkpoint, The Black Pitts, Kiss My Acid, Cross Guns

WSO2015Fibbers

October 2 2015

We Shall Overcome benefit

Paranoid Visions, I AM A Carcrash. Checkpoint, The Black Pitts, Kiss My Acid, Cross Guns

Fibber Magees

Green Day, Dog Day – Dublin 1991

GreenDay

December 15 1991

Green Day, Dog Day

The Attic
Yeah, yeah, it’s all true. Green Day played in the Attic. It was a wintry Sunday afternoon. They used my bass, They covered up my Sink stickers. They took off their trousers and 40 people saw it all. Retrospectively when people talk to me about ‘hope’ they mention Green Day, Fugazi and Nomeansno. If all the people who say they saw Green Day when they played with Dog Day in the Attic were actually there then the already unsteady floor in the venue would definitely have collapsed. On the day we lost £50 and the floor was perfectly safe. It’s kind of novel to be able to say that they played but I would much prefer if I was able to give you a recipe from the  band Dublin wasn’t really the party city and Green Day left for Belfast straight after the gig, but not before getting some directions and food. They had enjoyed themselves so much in Belfast the previous night that they wanted to get back as quickly as possible.

1991 ended for ‘hope’ with this gig. We had directly put on 29  gigs. We had been involved with other gigs in Cork, Belfast, Trinity, NCAD, and Kill. People from other counties in Ireland were starting to ask about putting on gigs (they either got the address from REACT or travelled up to Dublin for a gig). React was up to 5000 copies (I even find that hard to believe looking back) and there was an endless supply of bands looking to play. Being careful not to get carried away Green Day put a sense of perspective on it. 40 people.

Green Day Accounts

State of Fear, Cheapskate, Puget Sound Dublin 1997

CheapSkate_Tetsuo_StateOfFear

Nessun Dorma, Zygote, SMH Dublin 1992

NessunD

March 8 1992

Nessun Dorma, Zygote, SMH

The Grattan (moved from The Attic)

The Nessun Dorma gig the following month had just as poor a turnout. Both bands had travelled over in a bus, not the fancy tour bus kind that many bands travel in but a bit like a school bus (they’re the journeys the retired buses go on in Ireland).Like Andrew with Decadence Within, Emmet from Cork organised for Nessun Dorma to come over to Ireland and asked us to accomodate them in Dublin. Charlie’s was now closed to afternoon gigs so we had to try and find a venue open to allowing “underage  people” in to a gig.

The Attic weren’t too keen as, even though the floor had been reinforced, they didn’t want to go through the “hassle” of doing it again. Peter Quigley had been looking after the booking of the Grattan and the Fox since Not Our World started playing and he agreed to try an afternoon gig if it was a Sunday. Saturday is a traditionally busy shopping day and bars were uncomfortable compromising local businesses by allowing loud rock music and encouraging large congregations outside their establishments while their neighbours tried to get shoppers in. This suited Nessun Dorma so we tried for the Grattan.

Sundays in Ireland generally have a lethargic feel to them. For many it’s a lazy day. When very few people showed up for the gig we were very disappointed. This gig in the Grattan must have been the hardest gig all 3 bands have ever played and no doubt the 2 touring bands were very eager to get back into their bus for a rest. The bus was amazing. It was a  renovated old bus that the band could use for living in if need be. The atmosphere inside the Grattan was almost churchlike, very sombre. The crowd was poor and most people there were not happy to stay.

Bands That Changed a life – The Pleasure Cell

Bands that saved a life
The Pleasure Cell

Picture the scene. A boy with an attitude. Wanting to change a world be believes is coming to get him. Him and his punk mates. Only. Everyone over 21 is out to get him. Noone understands. Only when his music is playing is he happy. It’s 1985 and Dublin is grey. School means nothing. There’s very few jobs anyway. As a kid this boy loved sport. Played all day. Then punk rock became his training sessions. Bass guitar and plectrums replaced footballs and boots. Writing letters became his passion. Writing to people in bands. Waiting for those postal deliveries. Twice a day.

Of course the distraction of school existed. One day there was a small piece in Hot Press magazine about a band called The Pleasure Cell. It seemed interesting. The band were singing abut life in Finglas and listened to English counterparts like new Model Army. The lead singer was a recovering heroin addict and was happy to discuss it. They were giving some lunchtime talks in Bolton Street College. School attendance would be a problem, Of course that turned into no problem as a walk into town on the day of the Bolton Street gig was the only wise thing. Worry about school afterwards.

And so I trooped into Bolton Street and was blown away by the honesty of the three playing members and 1 non playing member of the band. As someone who didn’t drink swimming above water in a sea of alcohol that was my community I wanted in. Then the band played a set. I was rooted to my set. I wanted to go up and hug the 4 lads. Thanks, I’ve found what I’m looking for.

After that I went to see them play ahenever and wherever. They were so inclusive and encouraging in all I did. The band I was in at the time, Kill Devil Hill, played a mutated psychobilly sonud. It was fun but I was never really part of it. When the Pleasure cell were going to appear on Irelands biggest tv programme (most tv sets in the country had this show on every week) Noel was going to sing proudly wearing his homemade Kill Devil Hill t-shirt. I hadn’t the heart to tell him the night before when he finished it that we had split up that day. I did tell him and he wore his shirt buttoned over iot on the night.

They fused the Clash and new Model Army and had some rousing songs. Whether singing about police violence, changing your world or screaming for a brighter future they ploughed an independent route. Their self-released New Age single came out in 1988 on their own Statement label. With the single they issued a brick when sending it to the press. Do with this as you will.

Grey Dublin held little allure for people wishing to play music in the 80’s and the band headed to London, saaadly for me. When I travelled to see them in Hammersmith Clarendon they seemed to think that image might help them obtain some sort of record deal. As they squatted around Hammersmith they practiced and played wherever possible but never quite made that breakthrough. When they left Dublin they played to a packed Teachers Club, that was their highlight. Sold it out on their own merits.

After that they became one of the many thousands who emigrated, lost in the dreams of a better workd outside green and grey Ireland. They left a huge mark on me and when we were putting things together as Hope Promotions / Collective I endeavoured to emulate the Pleasure Cell philosophy at their gig. Greet people as they come in, treat them as you would wish to be treated. That way we can all be in this together

niallhope

Trouble Pilgrims – Instant Polaroid

Trouble Pilgrims

Instant Polaroid

Pilgrim Records

Any band that spawns from The Radiators deserves a mention here.  Any band that is supposed to play their classic album, released nearly 40 years and still a classic in many Dublin punks eyes, as part of a set opening for the Boomtown Rats and ditches a song in favour of a newly recorded one also deserves a special mention.

This band are the same in both instances and are called Trouble Pilgrims. Pete Holidai and Steve Rapid from the Radiators are now playing with Johnny Bonnie (Those Handsome Devils), Tony St Leger and Bren Lynott abd have released their second single, Instant polaroid.

The song is a guitar driven remembrance of the Man On The Bridge on Dublin’s O Connell Bridge.  Arthur Fields use to take pictures of couples crossing the River Liffey in Irelands Capital city and offer them to people on their journeys.  They are a story of a different Ireland, a time when the city shut at night in an era where Ireland was on the edge of Europe and we felt it.

This Weeks news – September 7

This weeks news September 7

The Winter Passing release their debut album, A different Space of Mind on September 18 on 6131 records
The launch gig for their pop punk emo mix in Ireland is in Grand Social on the 26th, the band will then cross the Irish Sea for a UK tour in October

Another good release this week is from Scotlands Make That a Take Records. They are releaseing the Dark Days EP from Perth band PMX . “Dark Days” is a mission statement that combines the pop-punk sensibilities of their earlier material with razor-sharp guitars, massive harmonies and a pervading darkness wrapped up with a super-speedy technical and progressive skate punk edge. Bursting with passion, frustration and a healthy dose of existential angst, “Dark Days” takes classic skate punk/melodic hardcore and adds an undeniable Scottishness with an injection of thrash metal, like classic Fat Wreck meets early 00s UK punk rock, never a dud release on that label.

Jello

Of course this is UMack Week – Two classic gigs on the way in Dublin. Jello Biafra and the Guantanamo School of Medicine with two of the best bands from the Dublin punk scene – Paranoid Visions and Sissy on Wednesday night
To celebrate the gig I dedicated my radio show to songs sung by Jello this week. Spanning all the Dead Kennedys records as well as collaborations with the Melvins, Al Jurgenson, NO WTO and a solo track as well as some songs from GSM who are playing this week

And then when you’ve had Thursday to recover we see the ex coming to Whelans.

the ex

For anyone left in the punk scene who don’t know about the Ex
“THE EX is a punk, industrial and experimental band from Amsterdam, Netherlands. They formed in 1979 at the height of the original punk explosion and have released over twenty full-length albums since, making them one of the longest-lived and most influential underground bands (along with The Fall) still in existence. THE EX just celebrated its 33⅓ year anniversary with a series of festivals. Not merely retrospective but primarily forward-looking and adventurous.
The Ex have defied categorization ever since they started playing in 1979. Born out of the punk explosion, when anything and everything was possible, the band have still managed to retain both curiosity and passion for their music. Using guitars, bass, drums and voice as ther starting point THE EX have continued to musically explore undiscovered areas right up to the present day: the early 1980s saw collaborations with industrial, experimental and jazz musicians and an Iraqi-Kurdish band. In the 90s the group found a myriad of partners from varied musical and non-musical backgrounds including Kamagurka, Tom Cora, Sonic Youth, Han Bennink, Jan Mulder, Shellac and Wolter Wierbos. In 2002 The Ex set up a lively musical exchange with Ethiopia, which eventually led to two CD recordings and hundreds of concerts with the legendary saxophonist Getatchew Mekuria.
After 33⅓ years, more than 25 albums and around 1800 performances the band continues to work as they did in when they began, completely independent of record companies, managers or roadies. Because of this ‘do it yourself’ work ethic The Ex is still a great example for other forward-thinking bands and musicians.
The Ex debuted with a single titled “Stupid Americans” on the Utregpunx vinyl 7″ compilation released by Rock Against records in Rotterdam. The release of their first 7″ All Corpses Smell the Same came shortly thereafter in 1980. Through the decades they gradually developed into their current form of highly intricate, experimental punk/post-punk/no wave-inspired work. Always involved in a large number of projects, both in and outside the band, its members have been able to keep their music fresh and exciting, and, some opine, constantly better.
Breaking from the relatively narrow confines of punk rock, The Ex has incorporated a wide array of influences, often from non-Western and non-rock sources. Some include Hungarian and Turkish folk songs, and more recently music from Ethiopia (including collaborations with Ethipian saxophonist Gétatchèw Mèkurya, Congo (shown in their tribute to Congolese street band Konono Nº1 and Eritrea (whose independence song is covered on Turn). Other examples of branching out stylistically include the improvised double album Instant and a release under the moniker Ex Orkest, a 20 piece big band assembled for performances at the esteemed Holland Festival.
The band has had successful collaborations with many disparate artists, including UK anarchist band Chumbawamba (sometimes using the name Antidote), Dog Faced Hermans, and with the late avant-garde cellist Tom Cora in the early 1990s, resulting in the watershed album Scrabbling At the Lock in 1991 and the follow-up And the Weathermen Shrug Their Shoulders in 1993. They have also collaborated with members of Sonic Youth, Dutch improvisers ICP Orchestra, and released a collaborative EP with America’s Tortoise.
In January 2009, front man and founding member G.W. Sok announced on the band’s website he quit the band. Arnold de Boer from the Amsterdam band Zea replaced him.”

And after that, if you have any energy left you can go see Vic Goddard and Subway Sect in Fibber Magees

niallhope

Forthcoming Gigs

Workmans Club 5th Birthday Celebrations – Sept 8th – 12th
Al Porter – Sept 8th
The Hot Sprockets – Sept 9th
Little Green Cars w/ guests Other Creatures – Sept 10th
Little Green Cars w/ guests Bleeding Heart Pigeons – Sept 11th
Eternal Summers w/ guests Pleasure Beach – Sept 12th
Tickets to all shows just €5

Jello Biafra + Paranoid Visions + Sissy – Hangar September 9

The Ex plus guests – Whelans – September 11

Vic Goddard and Subway Sect + The Dubtones + Gakk – Fibber Magees – September 11

Eternal Summers + Pleasure Beach – Workmans Club – September 12

Dope Body – Whelans – September 12

August Wells – Workmans Club – September 13

Sleaford Mods – Hangar – September 19

XSLF + Hooligan – Fibber Magees – September 19

La Misma + Disguise + Overbite + Surge – Dublin September 20
Unknown Mortal Orchestra – Whelans – September 26

The Winter Passing + Chewing on tinfoil + Kates party + Driveaway – Grand Social September 26

Wheatus – Whelans – September 28

B Dolan – Wormkans Club – September 29

We Shall Overcome – Dublin – October 2-4

Hard Working Class Heroes – Dublin – October 2+3

Juan Wauters + No Monster Club – Whelans – October 4

The Lemonheads – Academy – October 5

Hey Rosetta – Workmans Club – October 9

Giveamanakick – Whelans – October 10

Nothing Clean – Tenterhooks – October 10

Cockney Rejects – Grand Social – October 10

Inner Terrestials – Fibber Magees – October 16

English Dogs – Fibber Magees – October 23

dAVID kITT – wHELANS – oCTOBER 24

Litovsk – Dublin – October 25

US Girls – Whelans – October 25

Liturgy – Whelans – October 26

Dragster + Angry Itch + Stop start Again + Black Pitts + Jobseekers – Fibbers – October 30

Deer hunter button factory – November 1

Slaves – The Academy – November 5

Girl Band – Button Factory – November 7

Stiff Little Fingers – The Academy – November 13

Coitus + Paranoid Visions + Coldwar + Liberty – Fibbers – November 14

Mercury Rev – Button Factory November 22

Chelsea Wolfe – Button Factory November 25

Peter Hook and the Light – The Academy – November 27

OM – Button Factory – November 28

Therapy – Button Factory December 11

The Selecter – The Academy – December 11

Bad Manners – The Academy – december 28