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In Concert – out now Supporting Irish Red Cross

screen-shot-2016-12-07-at-21-28-40It’s been over 12 months in the making but we have finally released In Concert, Favourite Gigs of Ireland’s Music Community.

When we first saw the heartbreaking pictures from Aleppo we reached out to those people we know best, our friends in the music community.  Six months ago Hope *2 came out and this featured those in the punk community in an effort to raise money for pikpa lesvos centre.  We held back on many contributions from the Irish music scene as we felt it would be nice for this group to extend their support. The results are In Concert and whilst there are many more who could and deserve to be included we feel this can help form part of a ‘secret history’ of the irish music scene. People like Ted Carroll who founded Chiswick Records, Pete Holidai from Radiators, Cáit O’Riordan from the Pogues, Pat Clafferty of Mexican Pets, Deko Dachau from Paranoid Visions to more recent luminaries like Constance Keane from M(h)aol or Rob Flynn from Winter Passing.  105 contributors altogether speaking of showbands, leonard cohen, the clash, theatre of hate, golden horde, therapy? and so many more including U2.

The book is a benefit for Irish Red Cross specifically in their efforts to assist people forced to flee their homes in Syria

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Dark thoughts , Brighton Cowley club

Dark thoughts, telekineses, never
Brighton Crowley club

Funnily enough whenever I’m asked about my favourite gigs I tend to mention the ones I was involved in putting on rather than the many amazing spectacles I have travelled to see. First time in Brighton I saw fugazi in the dome and that was a special night. Fugazi felt like they were ready to bring our diy to a whole new level and that our small alternative was briefly seen as a progressive light by many more that the handfuls that had been screaming about it in each city. Against me were similar and that night in the hobgoblin in Brighton we were ready to take on the world and we were going to win. Hard skin and Dillinger four played in a venue I don’t remember but a night I will never forget. Classic songs if not a touch too much alcohol taken by some of the band members.

I’ve been to four gigs now in Brighton. The first three were all memorable so I had the bar was set very high for tonight’s offering. This was always going to be a struggle due to that elevated benchmark but got to start somewhere eh?

I had looked hard amongst posters for other gigs around the city and there was none with tonight’s line up on it. Even my visit to Crowley club during the day greeted me with closed doors and no sign of what was to come. It’s all about the internet these days. I guess people don’t need a flier or poster or gig listing if they have a Facebook event page!!

In all my times visiting here I’ve never entered the Cowley club, i must have travelled at times that it wasn’t open as the volunteers can’t run the venue/ space like many would wish them too. Tonight was some introduction . I know in our punk rock world that age doesn’t matter and attitude is all important but when you’re 49 and double nearly everyone’s age in the venue (in some cases treble) it doesn’t feel like that. And so I entered trying not to give across the impression that I was an undercover con as I took out my phone and lowered my head

First band on didn’t introduce themselves but there was some noise coming from the teenage collective. Huge tight distorted sound with screaming vocals

Second band on continued in the vein of expectation that we all know what they are called and I’m sure the rest of the crowd did. It kind of felt like walking in on a punk family gathering, even more so with no posters being on display anywhere for this gig, everyone know each other in the venue and this could be the resident noise band

I was in two minds about even coming out to this gig as a couple of issues of Razorcake and paul masons book on how we can mould our future was waiting for me. I decided to hold off on the reading in favour of the screamed word and was wondering if I’d made a big mistake.

I had only heard dark thoughts through band camp so their ramones esque tunes took on a completely different life tonight. Like dublins 101s it’s breakneck ramones with buzzing guitars but real tunes below them. By the end of their short set any concerns about coming out were gone and any thoughts on age difference had faded. Tunes for everyone. It wasn’t quite against me in the hobgoblin but a similar atmosphere prevailed and this gig will stay in my memory for a while yet

Niallhope

Cathal Funge. An interview with the broadcaster Cathal about his punk radio documentary.

What can we expect from the documentary?

 

The documentary is going to be a bit of a trip back forty years to tell the story of Irish music in 1977. I’ll be covering quite a few events from that year including The Boomtown Rats and The Radiators From Space both releasing their debut singles, Rory Gallagher headlining the Macroom Mountain Dew Festival (Ireland’s first outdoor rock festival), Lizzy headlining Dalymount with The Rats and The Rads supporting, The Clash in Belfast and Dublin and the launch of Hotpress.

 

Were there any surprises for you as you delved into the scene at the time?

 

There was a lot of talk in the UK press over the last twelve months about the 40th anniversary of British punk so I started to look at what was happening in Ireland around that time. The initial idea was to look at the Irish punk scene but after a bit of research I noticed a lot of things started to happen at once and not just in Dublin but across the country, North and South.

 

1977 in Ireland seems to be a year of beginnings for a modern Irish music scene. You had bands like The Radiators getting into the charts, rock festivals in Macroom and Dublin, The Rats on Top of the Pops, a national music magazine launched etc. The documentary in many ways is about a bunch of people just going for it, creating new ways of doing things and setting the tone for others to follow, which off course they did.

 

If you compare today’s vibrant local music scene to 1977, it doesn’t just feel like a different era, it feels more like a different planet!

 

What do you make of those early punk ‘pioneers’?

I love the DIY attitude and lot of the music from that era has stood the test of time. A lot of the events I cover in the documentary are not punk but they were inspired by the spirit and energy of time. It seems as if the climate for change was ripe and people went for it. In the case of Macroom, it was just a bunch of people in a small West Cork town trying to bring some extra business into their area. They came up with the idea of staging Ireland’s first rock festival and managed to pull it off with Rory Gallagher headlining the event at a time in his career when he was playing venues like Shea Stadium, not the local GAA pitch in Macroom.

 

At the same time, up the road in Cork City, Elvera Bulter (now label boss at Reekus Records) was in UCC and she started putting on gigs in City Hall including Dr Feelgood and The Stranglers. By the end of the year she was hosting the weekly Downtown Kampus gigs at the Arcadia which quickly established itself as the focal point of a new music scene in the city. That scene blossomed in the 80’s and gave us great bands like Stump and Microdisney.

 

I’m sure they didn’t realise it at the time, but a lot of these people were pioneers. They didn’t just do things, they also showed that there was a market for rock music in Ireland.

 

How did you get into music (as a fan) in the first place?

 

Growing up in Wexford, there wasn’t much going on in terms of music, no record shops, no gigs etc. I was very fortunate that my dad and older brother both had great tastes in music. My dad had a lot of old 60’s albums that I soaked up and then as I got a little older, I would sneak into my brother’s bedroom and rob/borrow some of his albums. So, anything from Teenage Fanclub to Nirvana, Mercury Rev, Pixies, Sonic Youth.

 

Around that time, I got a part time job as a petrol pump attendant in a local garage, working a few evenings after school and during summer holidays. The garage was in the middle of the country side and I sat in a hut for about 5 hours with only a radio to keep me company. Dave Fanning suddenly became my best friend and his nightly show was an education, as was Donal Dineen’s show on Today FM.

 

 

Any particular punk songs/albums/gigs that really moved you?

 

From the late 70’s era, I particularly love Buzzcocks first five singles and I think The Clash’s debut album from ’77 sounds great forty years on. In the documentary, I talk to Paul Burgess from Belfast band Ruefrex and Jake Reilly from The Blades about The Clash’s visit to Ireland in October ’77. The Trinity gigs have gone down in local music folklore, how many bands formed after that night out with Strummer and his gang? On the flip side, up in Belfast the gig was cancelled which caused a mini riot and some claim is was the night that the Belfast punk scene was born. I think that might be stretching it a little but it is interesting to hear about the impact the visit one band had on music fans in two very different cities in October ’77.

Cathal Funge….a great documentary on 1977 Punk in Ireland

Cathal Funge has produced an excellent radio documentary on 1977 the year that punk established a foothold in Ireland.

The show includes some great reflections by participants including two of the best bands of the era, the Undertones and the Radiators from Space. You can hear:

Elvera Butler (Reekus Records and Cork Kampus venue)

Smiley Bolger (DJ and promoter of Moran’s, McGonagles and the New Inn)

Fachtna O’Ceallaigh (manager of the Boomtown Rats)

John O’Neill (Undertones)

Pete Holidai (The Radiators from Space, Trouble Pilgrims)

John Creedon (broadcaster)

Donal Gallagher (manager of Rory Gallagher)

and the historian Diarmaid Ferriter.

It is a fascinating piece of work, and really captures the spirit of the times.

Here is a link to the documentary:

https://www.todayfm.com/Music/LISTEN:-1977–The-year-Irish-music-was-reborn

Cathal was kind enough to answer some of our questions about the documentary and what inspired him to delve deeper into the story of punk in Ireland.

 

 

May fest 2017

Hope Collective are delighted to be involved with Mayfest 2017. Mayfest is a celebration of Workers Clulture and is running nightly in Liberty Hall from May 1 to May 12.

Our event is on Tuesday May 2 with an event compered by Actor Bryan Murray. Joining Bryan will be Fran QUigle (booker of McGonagles in the 70’s), Smiley Bolger (Booked the New Inn and many others), Elvera Butler (Cork Promoter and main person behind Reekus Records). Peter Jones from Paranoid Visions, former Trinity College Ents Officer Edwina Forkin, the authrs of In Concert, Niall McGuirk and Michael Murphy. There will be guest appearances from Colm Walsh, Ken Duffy and Pete Holidai

All will be talking about their experiences in and around the music and punk scene in Dublin and ireland. It should be a fascinating evening as we continue to document what has gone before us.

Banter – Feb 21

On Tuesday February 21, myself, Michael and a number of those who’ve contributed to the book – plus some surprise guests – will join Jim Carroll at Banter to talk about the book, the notion of favourite gigs and read their selections as well. Audience contributions welcome too. Guests speaking include….
Ellie & Louise McNamara (Heathers) on The Mountain Goats, Bloomington 2011
Frances Roe (Jam Jar Jail) on Rocket from the Crypt, Dublin 2001,
Edwina Forkin (Zanzibar Films and ex-TCD Ents Officer) on Sonic Youth/Nirvana and early Therapy?, 1991
Elvera Butler (Reekus Records) on The Stranglers and The Who, 1970s
Suzanne Rhatigan (singer and promoter) on Grace Jones at Electic Picnic, 2015
Peter Jones (Paranoid Visions) on the Poison Girls at Sean McDermott Street, Dublin, 1983
Ferdia Mac Anna (director, novelist, screenwriter & Rock Devalera) on Thin Lizzy, Dublin, 1971
Peter Devlin (musician, producer and broadcaster) on The Specials/The Beat, Stardust, Dublin, 1981
Mick Heaney (journalist and DJ) on The Cramps, Boston, 1986

Tickets only €5.50 available here –
https://www.eventbrite.ie/e/banter-in-concert-tickets-31642900768?aff=es2

Banter on In Concert will take place at Wigam (Middle Abbey Street, Dublin 1) on Tuesday February 21. Doors open at 6pm and the event will kick off at 6.30pm.
Like the book, all proceeds will go to the Irish Red Cross’ Syria Appeal.

In Concert – The Trail of publicity

So, we have been blown over by peoples support for our book.  As you know it can be bought online and we hope to have it in a few shops soon.  It is hard to get it into shops when the times they are open is being spent holding down a day job.  We will get there.

In the meantime here is what some people are saying about the book

Fanning Sessions say it’s a great read

Jim Carroll kicked off a conversation in the Irish Times by asking What’s the best gig ever to take place?

Paul McDermott from Dublin City fm did a complete show dedicated to the book

Denis Goodbody went one better and read pieces from the book with some songs inbetween

The whole event was streamed live
Goldenplec called the list of contributors impressive

Facebook page for book is here

Launch date Jan 24 – Liberty Hall

In the shadow of James Connolly statue outside Dublin’s Liberty Hall and on the banks of the River Liffey we will be launching our book on Tuesday Jane 24. We will feature some songs and readings from contributors to In Concert as well as special guest speaker, John Roche from irish Red Cross.

We look forward to seeing as many of our friends as possible and with great thanks to SIPTU we will have this glorious backdrop to celebrate the book

A thought for the year

Since when

Since when

Has financial cost usurped human dignity?
Has the market dictates what we do for our people?
Is it ok to ignore human suffering?
Has our walk through life blinded us to the streets?
So let’s
Talk
Belong
Communication is vital to our sense of belonging
If you see a business you like
Buy something from it
If you see a business you don’t
Don’t
Remember that it’s ok not to feel ok
It’s ok to be worried
It’s ok to wish for change
If you want to see change
Seek that change
Be that change
Dream of a world where those who inhabit it seek to make it a better place for all
Where compassion overcomes profit
*****************
Having a dog gives one a great opportunity to get out in your local community. In my land of suburbia I imagine more people know my dog Strummer than they know of his namesake. My guess is more know him than me. Which is fine I travel incognito with my headphones for company many evenings as Strummer reacquaints himself with many garden pillars and trees. The smell of the city to him is a wondrous adventure. Over the past 6 weeks as he stopped every 10 yards I looked around in amazement at the homes and lights that enveloped them. My concern for global warming slightly waned as this led light wonderland brought a smile to my face. Christmas brings out that good feeling.
Of course there are many who don’t share that as the challenge of Christmas worries them it is a time when charity comes to the fore and people have a bit more time for others. I love it, I stick on it’s a wonderful life and smile. But now as the trees get shredded and the decorations are put away to gather dust for the next 11 months sadness does set in. A new year brings new challenges as we continue to try to make sense of our surroundings. It gives us a chance to take stock.
We have a chance to see what type of society we want to see. The Type of business we want to see stay open are the ones we should shop in. The life we want to see for our kids or our friends kids is the in we can lead. We have it in our grasp, it’s what I need so I can see those decorations come down.
Happy 2017
niallhope

Well, did I do it?

imageIt was during my Christmas break in 2015 that I set myself a challenge – Read 52 Books in a year.  1 a week – should be easy?

It all started with Steven Gerrard – a christmas present

The road to wigan pier followed closely.  George Orwells tale of how we can show a brighter future

As it was the centenary of 1916 Easter Rising there were plenty of books relating to that theme

Jimmy Wren’s The GPO Garrisson was one such story of all the people in the GPO that week

Kieran Glennon’s From Pogrom TO Civil War took in a slightly later time in Irelands Nationalist history

Roger Casement is not only a figure in Irish Nationalist History, prior to (and during)his involvement in Ireland culminating in his trial where he stated “Ireland has wronged no man, that has injured no land, that has sought no dominion over others – Ireland is treated today among the nations of the world as if she was a convicted criminal” he was a British Foreign diplomat.  His most notable work was exposing the slave trade in Congo and the  horrendous slaughter of Peruvian Indians.  The Devil and Misteer casement tells the story of Peru whole King Leopolds Ghost spoke of Congo

Russian troubadors Pussy Riot have had a lot written about them Words Will Break Cement is one of those

Kim Gordon has spoken a lot about how Pussy Riot are strong Women in a band and her Girl In  A Band book tells of her time in Sonic Youth and beyond

Chasing The Scream challenged my perception on the so-called War On Drugs and has really made me think about its relevance

As part of the challenge I asked my kids what book they would like me to read – Pele was my youngest ones choice.  A strange book about a character who exists in a world of stardom and almost seems like an alter ego of Edson Arantes do Nascimento. Luca Caioli asked is Messi More Than A Superstar and the answer is very much yes in his mind, interesting that humility is his biggest trait after being a superstar ball player

During Easter Week I decided to take a 360 turn and see how many Ross O’Carroll Kelly books I could cram in this year.  Ross is the obnoxious, sexist beast known to so many Dubliners. The teenage Dirt-Bag years is one of the early ones, his formative college years, a J1 American Visa and the theft of a statue from UCD all get the O’Carroll gloss.

One of the hardest books to read was The Wrath of Cochise, not for the level of detail of the blood feud between the Chiracuau Indians and the US Army but just the level of detail.  Terry Mort has a way with words, and it’s a long way. It was enlightening to read about the ‘White men’ being willing to loose lives in wars and use that as a tactic or about the Irish Bounty hunter James Kirker.  it is interesting that this small island has produced many people who travelled for different reasons and had an impact around the world. Kirker was a hugely successful bounty hunter, willing to work, and kill, for the highest bidder.  There were many Irish recruits into the US Army in the 1850’s – over 30% of those enlisted were Irish hunger having forced them from their homes. Then there were those being sold into slavery, a tale of woe that still continues.

I re-introduced myself to the world of pop punk and Lookout records through Larry Livermores two book and the story of Lookout. Interesting that a label with no initial aspirations other than to release records and get bands heard ended up as a multi million dollar business and the tale of how those millions made people want more. Another label I re-introduced my self to was K Records. Love Rock Revolution, the story of K was published a few years ago but I missed out on it then. It tells the story of Calvin Johnson and K, much like Lookout, a label that saw huge increases in sales when Nirvana got signed but thankfully unlike lookout K is still going.  Sarah records was another label I listened to many bands from and Pop Kiss tells its story with a glorious jangle.

The Lost Women Of Rock Music – Female Musicians of the punk era by Helen Reddington is still altogether too true as it tells the battle females have just to be recognised in rock.. Punk promised to breakthrough  as more and more females joined bands but the establishment re-established its hold and MTV had a different story to tell. It drove it underground

NOFX were a band whose antics when they were in ireland I had blocked out of memory. I knew there was a story around a fireplace and an inscription but the tides of time held no grudges. it was sad to read stories of how fireplaces in other cities, belonging to other peoples parents, were treated with similar disdain. Like spoilt children the drug fuelled lifestyle of nofx left casualties in their wake. We had to run other gigs after they left town, we had to mend a lot of bridges. This book is not surprising in its tome. Pity I like their music so much.

Jack Doyle’s autobiography slowed me down and made me realise I wouldn’t meet my target.  Instead of 1 book a week I went for one a fortnight.  It halved the overall number but still was hopeful and realistic.

This was bropught to fruitiion with somw time over Christmas allowing me to complete my final two.  How Champions Thnk gives some snippets into the mind of sucessful people and it finashed in style with the Aesthetic of Our Anger – a critique of anarcho punk, politics and music.  Although this book is aimed more at an academic audience it is an excellent reflection on the influence of Crass throughout popular culture.

So next year I will try and better this, wish me luck

This years List

1. King Leopolds Ghost

2. The Devil and Me

3. Steve Gerard – My Story

4. Jimmy Wren – The Gpo Garrisson

5. Kieran Glennon – From Pogrom to Civil War

6. Paul Howard – Ross O Carroll Kelly, the teenage Dirtbag years

7. George Orwell – The Road to wigan pier

8. Johan Hari – Chasing the scream

9. Pele – the autobiography

10. Kim Gordon – Girl In  A Band

11. Masha Gessen – Words Will Break Cement

12. The Wrath of Cochise – The Blood Feud That Sparked the Apache Wars

13. Larry Livermore – Spy Rock Memories

14. Larry Livermore – How to Ru(i)n a record label

15. Jeff Alullis – NOFX The Hepatitis Bathtub and other Stories

16. Kevin Prested – Punk USA – The Rise and Fall of Lookout Records –

17. Mark Baumgarten – Love Rock Revolution – The Story of K Records

18. Luca Caioli – Messi: More Than a Superstar

19. Michael White – Pop Kiss – the life and afterlife of sarah records

20 Helen Reddington  – The lost Women of Rock Musc

21.Dave Dictor – MDC

22. The Defects – Nervous Breakdown

23  Michael Taub -Jack Doyle The gorgeous God

24  Adrian Chiles – We Don’t Know What We’re Doing

25 William Macaskill -Doing Good Better

26  Bob Rotella – How Champions Think

27  Mike dines and Matthew Worley – The Aesthetic of our anger

Contributors to ‘In Concert’

screen-shot-2016-12-07-at-21-28-40When seeing images from war torn Syria or hearing stories of a people ravaged by war we were moved to try and dom something so we reached out to the music community. I put some of these into Hope *2 fanzine earlier this year but we thought it’d be nice to chronicle the Irish submissions, a secret history of the musicians influencing the bands that influenced us

FROM THE IRISH RED CROSS

5 years on and the plight of Syrians continues. The figures make for shocking reading. In a country with an estimated population of 22.2 million the situation is worsening almost on a daily basis. The number of people in need has increased from 1 million in 2012 to 13.5 million in 2016.

For those that can remain in Syria, regular access to basic needs such as food, water and medical assistance continues to be a challenge. Three in four are currently living in poverty and 5.7 million people are in need of adequate shelter.
Whole neighbourhoods have been destroyed, forcing families to flee in search of safe shelter, but there is little available. When they left their homes, many did so with only the clothes they were wearing. They have nothing else. More than half of those affected are children.
People continue to flee fighting within Syria underlining yet again the dire situation families in Syria are facing. It is vital that they are able to seek protection and support as conflict continues to rage. There are an estimated 6.6 million internally displaced inside the country.
Others are unable to flee and remain under siege as war rages around them. At the start of this year the Red Cross Red Crescent eventually gained access to towns such as Madaya, Foua and Kefraya. The blockade on life saving supplies lasted for months with ordinary Syrian families paying the price.
On entering Madaya our colleague Marianne Gasser, described the situation:
”I was taken to what was euphemistically called the “health centre”. It was, in fact, one room in the basement of a house. Ushered into the semi-darkness, I was met by the sight of limp bodies lying on blue blankets on the floor: elderly people, weak from hunger and illness. There were several children, hollow-faced. I noticed the needle marks on their arms where drips had been administered to try to give them the sustenance they needed to survive.”
The Red Cross Red Crescent is committed to bringing aid to the millions of people affected by this crisis inside Syria. In addition, we are reaching the millions who have fled over the country’s border into the wider region and now wait in refugee camps, uncertain of what their future holds.
https://www.redcross.ie/latest-appeals/syria-appeal/

List of Acts
1 TED CARROLL (promoter, manager, record shop owner and owner of Chiswick Records)
ROCK AND ROLL IN IRELAND AND BEYOND

2 JOE WEADICK (Red Seven/Columbia Showband)
RED SEVEN, LONDON, 1963

3 MARCUS CONNAUGHTON (broadcaster, author)
FLEETWOOD MAC, DUBLIN, 1969

4 BRIAN O’KEALLAIGH (The Gorehounds)
GOOSE LAKE INTERNATIONAL MUSIC FESTIVAL, MICHIGAN, 1970

5 FERDIA MACANNA (Rocky de Valera, The Rhythm Kings, author)
THIN LIZZY, DUBLIN, 1971

6 GERRY MCAVOY (Rory Gallagher band, author)
RORY GALLAGHER, BELFAST, 1971

7 JOHN MCKENNA (broadcaster)
LEONARD COHEN, DUBLIN, 1972

8 PETE HOLIDAI (The Radiators, Trouble Pilgrims)
ALICE COOPER/ROXY MUSIC, LONDON, 1972

9 CIARAN MCLAUGHLIN (The Undertones, That Petrol Emotion, Everlasting Yeah)
PLANXTY, DERRY, 1973

10 NEIL MCCORMICK (author, journalist, musician)
U2, DUBLIN, 1976

11 DAVE SWEENEY (the Max Quad Band, Rocky de Valera and the Gravediggers, the Fat Lady Sings)
DR FEELGOOD, DUBLIN, 1976

12 TONY CLAYTON-LEA (author, journalist, DJ)
IGGY POP, 1977

13 DAMIAN O’NEILL (The Undertones, That Petrol Emotion, Everlasting Yeah)
SIOUXSIE & THE BANSHEES/THE HEARTBREAKERS, MANCHESTER, 1977

14 JUDE CARR (Heat fanzine)
THE RADIATORS FROM SPACE, DUBLIN, 1977

15 AIDAN O’ROURKE (The Sinners)
THE CLASH, DUBLIN, 1977

16 JAKE REILLY (The Blades)
THE CLASH, DUBLIN, 1977

17 JOHN FISHER (The Dandelion Market)
THE CLASH, DUBLIN, 1977

18 ELVERA BUTLER (promoter, head of Reekus Records)
FROM THE WHO TO THE STRANGLERS

19 BRIAN SEALES (DC Nien, Tokyo Olympics)
THE STRANGLERS, DUBLIN, 1978

20 BARRY COOKE (Dead Fridge in the Road)
STIFF LITTLE FINGERS, DUBLIN, 1978

21 PAUL CHARLES (booking agent, author)
SIGNING THE UNDERTONES, BELFAST, 1978

22 GERRY SMYTH (author)
THE BOOMTOWN RATS, 1978

23 PAT O’DONNELL (The Fountainhead, producer)
IAN DURY, DUBLIN, 1978

24 RAYMOND GORMAN (That Petrol Emotion, Everlasting Yeah)
DEXY’S MIDNIGHT RUNNERS, COLERAINE, 1979

25 DAVID LINEHAN (Aidan Walsh and the Screaming Eagles, Hooligan)
R0CKY DE VALERA, DUBLIN, 1979 + OTHERS

26 RORY STOKES (The Sussed, the Spiders From Kimmage)
U2/THE SUSSED, DUBLIN, 1979

27 FRANK RYNNE (Those Handsome Devils, the Babysnakes)
THE RAMONES, DUBLIN, 1980

28 BILLY MCGRATH (UCD Ents Officer 1975-1976, manager of The Atrix and Stagalee,
TV producer, documentary maker)
U2, LONDON, 1980

29 SÉAN O’CONNOR (The Lookalikes)
THIN LIZZY/THE LOOKALIKES, DUBLIN, 1980

30 PETER DEVLIN (The Devlins, producer, broadcaster)
THE SPECIALS/THE BEAT, THE STARDUST, DUBLIN, 1981

31 PAUL BYRNE (In Tua Nua, producer)
ECHO AND THE BUNNYMEN, DUBLIN, 1981

32 ANDREW BASS (Reveille, producer, studio owner)
U2/REVEILLE, GALWAY, 1981.

33 CÁIT O’RIORDAN (The Pogues, Radiators, PreNup)
U2, LONDON, 1981

34 STANO (artist, musician, composer)
TOM WAITS, DUBLIN, 1981

35 CATHAL O’REILLY (The Shade, Luggage)
KID CREOLE AND THE COCONUTS, DUBLIN, 1981

36 DEKLAN DACHAU (Paranoid Visions)
THEATRE OF HATE, DUBLIN, 1981

37 CION O’CALLAGHAN (freelance Drummer – Paddy Casey, Shane McGowan)
ROCKY DE VALERA, DUBLIN, 1982

38 COLM O’DWYER (TCD Ents Officer 1991-1992)
U2, 1982

39 PETER JONES (Paranoid Visions)
POISON GIRLS, DUBLIN, 1983

40 DARAGH MCCARTHY (musician, filmmaker: The Stars are Underground)
VIRGIN PRUNES, DUBLIN, 1983

41 WILL WALSH (The Pleasure Cell, The John Wayne Memorial Dancing Lizardmen)
THE SMITHS, 1983

42 ROY WALLACE (Toxic Waste, documentary maker)
TOXIC WASTE, BREMEN, 1984

43 PAT CLAFFERTY (Mexican Pets)
THE CLASH, DUBLIN, 1984

44 KIERAN GLENNON (DJ Dr Night Dub)
THE JOHN WAYNE MEMORIAL LIZARDMEN, DUBLIN, 1985

45 HUGO FITZGERALD (Kill Devil Hill)
THE MEMBRANES/THE PLEASURE CELL/KILL DEVIL HILL, DUBLIN, 1985

46 COLM WALSH (manager Intoxicating Rhythm Section, Sultans of Ping)
THE GOLDEN HORDE/THE GOREHOUNDS/BONESHAKERS/PARANOID VISIONS,
DUBLIN, 1985

47 PAUL PAGE (The Whipping Boy)
ECHO AND THE BUNNYMEN, DUBLIN, 1985

48 MICK HEANEY (journalist, DJ)
THE CRAMPS, BOSTON, 1986

49 GARETH MURPHY (author, Cowboys and Indies)
U2, LONDON, 1987

50 REG GORDON (photographer, The Hope Collective)
SO MANY SUNDAYS, DUBLIN, LATE 80’S EARLY 90’S

51 JIM DAVIS (TCD Ents Officer 1990-1991),
PHIL CHEVRON, DUBLIN, 1990

52 PHILIP O’CONNOR (author, journalist, musician, The Banished),
FUGAZI / THERAPY?, DUBLIN, 1990

53 DAVE O’GRADY (promoter, publicist, Gilded ALM),
THERAPY?, DUBLIN, EARLY 90’S

54 SMILEY BOLGER (DJ, promoter Morans, McGonagles, the New Inn)
THAT PETROL EMOTION, DUBLIN, 1990

55 NEIL DOWLING (promoter, Event Ease)
STONES ROSES, BELFAST, 1990/BOLT THROWER, DUBLIN, 1990

56 EDWINA FORKIN (film producer, TCD Ents Officer 1989-1990)
SONIC YOUTH/NIRVANA 1991

57 JILL FORTYCOATS (Mexican Pets)
THE EX/DOG FACED HERMANS, DUBLIN, 1991

58 FINBAR MCLOUGHLIN (Gearhead Nation)
THE EX/DOG FACED HERMANS, DUBLIN, 1991

59 CANICE KENEALY, (Engine Alley)
PRIMAL SCREAM, DUBLIN, 1992

60 SEAN CAMPBELL, (author)
U2, KANSAS CITY, 1992

61 KEVIN MARTIN (promoter, fanzine editor)
MOBY/ORBITAL/APHEX TWIN, CHICAGO 1993

62 JOHNNY BOYLE (Lir, Pugwash, Picturehouse, Marianne Faithfull, The Frames)
RAGE AGAINST THE MACHINE, DUBLIN, 1993

63 BARRY MCCORMACK (Jubilee All-Stars, solo artist)
SWERVEDRIVER, DUBLIN, 1993

64 PHIL UDELL (journalist, State ie, Word-Up Collective)
BACK TO THE PLANET, DUBLIN, 1993

65 EILEEN HOGAN (author, lecturer)
THERAPY?, LIMERICK, 1994

66 PETESY BURNS (Toxic Waste, FUAL, The Outcasts, member of Warzone Collective)
VICTIMS FAMILY/GROTUS, DUBLIN, 1994

67 TOM POLLARD (The Pyrex Babies)
ROLLINS BAND, DUBLIN, 1994

68 KIERAN KENNEDY (The Black Velvet Band)
THE BLACK VELVET BAND, SWITZERLAND, 1994

69 MICHELLE MCCARTHY (marketing manager, Madison Square Garden)
GARTH BROOKS, DUBLIN, 1995

70 WAYNE P SHEEHY (producer/studio owner, drummer with Ron Wood)
RON WOOD, TORONTO, 1990s

71 PAUL McDERMOTT (DJ, zine editor, lecturer)
CATHAL COUGHLAN & NINE WASSIES FROM BAINNE, CORK, 1997

72 IAN PEARCE (Split Red/Los Cabras/The Dangerfields/Comply Or Die)
ABHINANDA, BELFAST, 1998

73 EMM GRYNER (David Bowie/The Cardigans/The Cake Sale/solo artist)
DAVID BOWIE, DUBLIN, 1999

74 COLM O’CALLAGHAN (journalist, broadcaster)
ELVIS COSTELLO, DUBLIN, 1999

75 FRANCES ROE (Jam Jar Jail)
ROCKET FROM THE CRYPT, DUBLIN, 2001

76 EMMET GREENE (Bandicoot Promotions),
BOBBY CONN, CORK, 2002

77 KIERAN CUNNINGHAM (sports editor, The Star)
CATHAL COUGHLAN, CORK, 2005

78 ROISIN NIC GHEARAILT (M(h)aol)
FLAMING LIPS, 2005/DEADMAUS, 2009

79 EOIN DEVEREUX (author, lecturer)
MORRISSEY, OSTIA, 2006

80 JIM ROGERS (author, lecturer)
CHRISTY MOORE, DUBLIN, 2007

81 CONSTANCE KEANE (M(h)aol)
INCUBUS, DUBLIN, 2007

82 THE LATE DAVID TURPIN (artist)
LAURIE ANDERSON OLYMPIA THEATRE, 2007)

83 PETE MURPHY (publicist)
TOM WAITS, DUBLIN, 2008

84 DES O’BYRNE (The Golden Horde, NYC DJ),
GÉTATCHÈW MÈKURYA AND THE EX, NEW YORK, 2008

85 VONA GROARKE (author, Spindrift),
RICHARD HAWLEY, DERBYSHIRE, 2009

86 ROB FLYNN (The Winter Passing),
HAVE HEART, DUBLIN, 2009

87 ROBBIE ROBINSON (film director, An Irish Exorcism and member of the
Intoxicating Rhythm Section Captain Tripps),
KINGS X, LONDON, 2009

88 AIDAN WALSH (musician, rehearsal room proprietor)
AIDAN WALSH AND THE SCREAMING EAGLES, DUBLIN, 2010

89 DAVE LONG (Into Paradise),
THERAPY?, DUBLIN, 2010

90 BRIAN CROSBY (musician, Bell X1, The Cake Sale, producer)
SUFJAN STEVENS, BERLIN, 2011

91 ELLIE & LOUISE MACNAMARA (Heathers)
THE MOUNTAIN GOATS, BLOOMINGTON, IN., 2011

92 MICHELLE DOYLE (Sissy)
THE RAINCOATS, SEATTLE, 2012

93 JUSTIN MCDAID (freelance journalist, Golden Plec)
ENABLERS, DUBLIN, 2013

94 JIM CARROLL (journalist, broadcaster)
THE GLOAMING 2014

95 COLIN COULTER (author, co-editor Ireland Under Austerity)
RUEFREX, 2014

96 SUZANNE RHATIGAN (singer, promoter)
GRACE JONES, COUNTY LAOIS, 2015

97 HENRY CLUNEY (Stiff Little Fingers, X-SLF)
SOLO, BLACKPOOL, 2015

98 JOHN O’FLYNN (author)
MAPPING POPULAR MUSIC, DUBLIN, 2015

99 CLODAGH SPUD (fanzine editor)
RUDE PRIDE/THE SULTANS/TAKERS AND USERS/THE DIVILS
DUBLIN/BELFAST, 2015

100 PAUL PURCELL (DJ, founder of Glacial Sounds record label),
SWING TING, MANCHESTER, 2015

101 MICHAEL McCAUGHAN (TCD Ents Officer 1984-1985, author; The Price of Our Souls: Gas, Shell & Ireland),
JELLO BIAFRA, DUBLIN, 2015

102 GARRY O’NEILL (cultural historian, author)
VARIOUS

103 TERRY O’NEILL (manager of Thin Lizzy and others, promoter and publicist)
VARIOUS

104 ANTO DILLON (editor, Loserdom fanzine)
VARIOUS

105 JAMES HENDICOOT (freelance journalist, NME, Dublin Gazette)
TALKING WITH THE DROPKICK MURPHYS, 2013

The book was compiled, funded and published by two veterans of the Dublin DIY (do-it-yourself) music scene, Niall McGuirk and Michael Murphy.
They came up with a simple idea to raise funds for the Irish Red Cross Syria Appeal. Ask people in Ireland’s music community to write about their favourite gigs.
People love talking about gigs. People love hearing about great gigs.
So they asked some of their favourite musicians, writers and behind-the-scenes characters to remember some outstanding gigs. Then they asked friends of friends who asked friends of friends.
This book is a compilation of over one hundred of the best of those gig memories. It includes recollections of gigs that were legendary and influential (Fleetwood, the Clash, Leonard Cohen, the Smiths), as well as gigs that were quickly forgotten. From immaculately presented stadium gigs to ramshackle events in sketchy halls; from showbands to punk, death metal and dance it documents some of the inspiring, brilliant and bizarre events witnessed by Ireland’s music community far and wide.

Quotes from Niall and Michael:
It is a brilliant book. We are proud of it. Look at the brilliant writing. These people weren’t just members of Ireland’s music community, they weren’t just witnesses to spectacular, sometimes life-changing, gigs: they are also outstanding writers.
We thought that it was particularly important to include some of the ‘forgotten heroes’ of the Irish music community. To hear the voices of the people who were ‘there’ who were a major part of the scene but are never included in the history.