Thursday tunes

Book Yer Ane Fest is a three-day celebration of DIY punk music and culture that aims to be a positive force while raising money and awareness for and support the great work of many great people and organisations within our community. Started as an all-dayer in a Perth pub in 2008, the evolution of Book Yer Ane Fest continues in 2017 as it prepares to welcome 50+ local, national and international artists to Dundee to perform across three venues in the heart of the city over the first weekend of December.


I saw Chris recently in Dublin and was blown away by the honesty and integrity. Playing to a crowd numbering single digits it mattered little to the Canadian.

Kaddish roar and scream and move and swing in a way you may have heard before but with a passion rarely copied


No Matter are making the trip over from Northern ireland. Snotty Gobby pop punk perfection


Tongue trap will be bringing their noise and message


Scotish pop punk diy giant Uniforms will be providing the real sing a long tunes for the weekend

We Shall Overcome Dublin 2017

PUNK

D.I.Y

40

 

40 Years of Punk and D.I.Y. in Ireland.

 

The Hope Collective proudly presents a series of chats to celebrate the 40th Anniversary of the pivotal TV Tube Heart from the Radiators From Space.

 

Grand Social, Dublin

Sunday 1st October 2017

5 pm to 9 pm

 

Followed by a Grant Hart/ Hüsker Dü celebration. Listening to some of their songs.

Admission €5

 

 

All proceeds to Aoibhneas Women’s Refuge and Crosscare homeless charity.

http://www.aoibhneas.org/

http://www.crosscare.ie/index.php/residential-adult

 

Members of Ireland’s punk and DIY music community will chat about their experiences, the fun and the legacy of punk and DIY.

 

Speakers:

 

Steve Rapid and Pete Holidai (Radiators)

Kitty Kav (the Boy Scoutz)

Deborah Blacoe

Suzanne Rhatighan (Toy With Rhythm)

Ferdia MacAnna (Rocky de Valera/The Rhythm Kings)

Elvera Butler (Cork Kampus, Reekus Records)

Bernie Furlong (the Golden Horde)

Edwina Forkin (first female Ents Officer in TCD/film-maker)

Caroline O’Sullivan (DJ/promoter)

Clodagh, (Hope Collective, Slanted and Enchanted fanzine, GRIT)

Aoife Destruction (Paranoid Visions)

Peter Jones (Paranoid Visions, FOAD Records, DIY promoter)

 

 

This event is part of the global We Shall Overcome initiative of local events to raise money and awareness for local charities.

 

Contact:

Niall@thumped.com

Or Michael at MermaidLakeMusic@yahoo.com

 

 

Tickets available here

https://www.eventbrite.ie/e/punk-diy-40-tickets-37997978978

 

 

 

Thursday Tunes Week 3

This weeks tunes are based in punk rock then and now.

Radiators
Under Clerys Clock
Much has been written about the Radiators releasing TV Tube Heart 40 years ago. Pete Holidai talked about it here this week and although Under Clerys Clock isn’t on that album it holds a special place in many people’s hearts in Ireland. A punk rock love song at a time when there wasn’t too many AND an anthem for a time in Ireland when same sex relationships were very much scorned


Downtown Boys
Full Communism
Downtown Boys are coming to Ireland next month. I hope I don’t miss it, please remind me

Wonk Unit
Go Easy
Wonk Unit are coming over next February and I for one can not wait. A modern Snuff for the generation that never experienced the magic that was Snuff

Snuff
Not Listening
Not sure whe n you last heard this but it’s worth 2 nd a half minutes

A Page of punk
I was at this gig, incredible energy. This doesn’t quite capture it but you can get the idea

niallhop

Thursday’s Tunes: Songs of Inspiration

Petrol Girls
Touch Me Again

Summer’s almost over, sometimes we need a bit of a boost, a bit of inspiration to propel us into the colder months.

This week’s playlist is a reminder of just how diverse and creative the music influenced and inspired by punk was, and is. There are some old classics here, like Masquerade from the Skids, Hong Kong Garden from Siouxsie, Enemies from the Radiators (which is my favourite Irish single of all time), the Ruts with West One (Shine On Me).

Then we have a bit of Scream, showing how hardcore brought a new life and creativity to punk in the early 1980s. Along with Minor Threat, Black Flag, Seven Seconds, Dead Kennedys and MDC, Scream made emotional, direct and turbo-charged music. The clip here feature Dave Grohl on drums in his pre-Nirvana and pre-Foo Fighters days.

Following that we have some of the new bands that are part of the multi-faceted family, Petrol Girls, Heavy Drapes and Interrobang?!.
The we have a bit of Irish music….the mighty Paranoid Visions with the TV Smith, the vital force behind the Adverts.

And finally a really great documentary on the Scars. A brilliant band from Edinburgh who like to many other artists of the era were influenced by Bowie and Roxy Music and then found the spark of creativity from the Pistols and the Clash to create their own sound.

Michael

The Skids Masquerade

Siouxsie and the Banshees
Hong Kong Garden

The Radiators
Enemies

Ruts
West One (Shine on Me)

Scream
Feel Like That

Petrol Girls
Touch Me Again

Interrobang
I’m So Taciturn

Heavy Drapes
Into The Blue

Paranoid Visions with TV Smith
Outsider Artist

Scars
Documentary

Bear Trade Interview

 

Anybody who has followed this blog will know of my respect and admiration for uk band Bear Trade. Last week I described as “think Leatherface, the replacements and wedding present getting together to write some songs with northern sensibility” for Thursday Tunes. Or when I reviewed their excellent new album, Silent Unspeakable and described them as “I know none of bear Trade but the beauty of music makes me feel like they are in my community and we all look out for each other. Along the way they are providing part of the soundtrack and it’s such a good one it would be a real shame if you missed out.” In 2014 I described them as my “new favourite band” and nobody has overtaken them since. I thought it only proper, in a blog that documents what is good in diy, that Bear Trade get their deserved space and sent the bass player Lloyd some questions.

For the benefit of people reading can you give me a breakdown of band members and maybe a feel of some of the bands you have been in or indeed still are.

Greg was in 46 Itchy, The Mercury League, Former Cell Mates, Broken Few and also most recently toured with Medictation
Peter was the drummer in Leeds fast punks The Mingers
Callum played in Writhe and with Pure Graft
Lloyd played in Blocko, Ruin You!, Southport and Spines

Greg, Peter and I have known each other for years from our previous bands, and Callum was friends with Greg…when none of us had a band and we all lived relatively close to each other, we were naturally drawn to each other as we are pretty much on the same page musically and personally..

What’s the relationship with Japanese record labels? Have you tried to get the band on any particular label?

I knew Kazu at Waterslide since back when Blocko toured in Japan which was booked by Yoichi at Snuffy Smile who put out our split with Minority Blues Band there to coincide. Kazu had a tie in as a sister label with Boss Tuneage (who Blocko released records with, and Waterslide distributed), so that helped me and Southport get records out there too and a chance to tour. He does a great job and is a great person with a wonderful family, and so it was a no brainer to ask him if he wanted to help out when Bear Trade were recording. He actually helped remix/master our first CDEP there, “Whiskey On A Bluebird” before release. It also worked well in as much as Waterslide do primarily CD only releases, so in terms of formats that ticked that specific box.

My feeling of a bear trade practice or gig is a gang of mates getting together (probably in a bar) and having a chat about life and a sing song. Is that an accurate description

Yeah, pretty much spot on mate! Hahahaha! I guess our band output is a continuation of our collective personalities and likes/dislikes. Three of us are married with children now too, so it gives us a chance to recharge our batteries and simply be mates out together sharing – what we believe is – our special bond.

You’ve a few videos on YouTube, who does them for you? Why the need for this?

Greg pretty much made them all. “Spielgerg” can go a bit left field sometimes, but as he has access to the gear and the skills to mould the visuals around a song we all play a willing part. There is no real “need” I guess, solely provides a fun and different medium for presenting a song and ourselves I guess, and again I would like to believe that these captured the essence of what we are about. My kids star in a couple for example.

Words, are they important to a song?

Very – words and dialect and meaning, and how they can elicit a feeling or emotion in a listener. In my opinion it is certainly a skill that Greg has honed and a lot of people find that they can relate to them, either specifically or in capturing a reflected view of their own daily challenges and struggles in life.

My life is in its fiftieth year so I can relate to many of the words on offer. For those those who haven’t read up on the band can you tell us what you sing about? Death is a reoccurring theme, any reason for this?

The songs are very much around the day to day occurrences in life that getting older throws up, about our relationships with people, with animals, with alcohol…as we get older death becomes more and more a part of living, and so how we deal with those losses is brought more into focus more often. On the flipside, family life is also about nurturing our relationships with our partners, and also creating new life, and how that in turn changes your perception and outlook on the past, present and future. “Sad punk for happy drunks” Drew Millward labelled us. Pretty apt I guess.

I have to talk football. Are you a season ticket holder? What is the ultimate aim for a Bromley fan like yourself?

I was a season ticket holder for a couple of years, but living near York meant for a long while the closest Bromley games in the regionalised south east centric leagues for me were still around the M25. I made the trip a few times a season, but their amazing title win in 2014/15 and elevation to the Conference National (now just The National League) opened up a whole range of games much nearer or more accessible to home. Funnily enough it often takes me longer to get to some of these games than my friends from the South East, but there are a few northern exiles who get together and travel to these, meeting fellow fans there. I would recommend reading Home And Away, by Dave Roberts, which is a best selling tale of that first season in the big boys league and which I feature on the cover and also in some pages. Bear Trade get a mention too, as Dave is a fan and sees us when we play in Leeds.

The ultimate aim in the 2015/16 season was to not get relegated. Most of the people I go to the match with I have known for approaching 30 years, and there were times when if it wasn’t for that kinship there would have been little reason to go. The club was on its backside, and very nearly slid into oblivion. So those old school heads remain realistic and grateful for what we are currently enjoying. Lot of us have sons now so we’re passing the bug on to them! Going forwards, the club has a phenomenal owner (and ex player) who saved us…we now have sensible investors and are building the infrastructure including a new stand with facilities, developing a huge Academy system and we now have a 3G pitch which is a valuable asset, along with our 3G training facilities. The aim is to try and build a club where the finance is self generated from not only match days, but throughout the week, with a core of youngsters brought through from a child to the ultimate aim of the 1st team. So I’m just enjoying the ride just now J

I often wonder for fans of teams in the conference as it seems like they are the “real” football fans. If their team gets promoted to the football league do they loose their grip on reality? What is it with football and it’s completely incredible sums of money? I find it so difficult to even read about it these days as huge businesses take over clubs and community seems to be less of a thing.

Yeah, I fell out of love with football like that 30 years ago, mainly because football fans were solely treated as a commodity and the police seemed solely interested in making your day as sterile and controlled as possible. Funnily enough, there has always been a similar pecking order in non league circles, and currently Billericay Town are making national headlines as they have a new testosteroned to the max Essex millionaire pumping insane amounts of money in and signing ex league players (e.g. Jamie O’Hara, Jermaine Pennant), as well as deciding he will be the manager too. He is trying to play the “community” card here but you can’t pay for that, only attract sycophants and hangers on and glory hunters. Of course, it would be naïve to not accept that money will always have an influence, but what is happening there is being done in a manner which is both vulgar and classless…two words which describe much of the Sky Sports/Premier League/Champions League world of today.

Water slide ask you to put together lloydfest with an unlimited budget as they have unearthed a footballer with unlimited talent. They give you free reign on 6 bands to ask who would they be?

The Wedding Present (George Best era line up)
Broccoli
Hot Water Music
Jawbreaker
Strike Anywhere
The Cure

You’re on the guestlist Niall


You’re a family man, what gives you the urge to leave the family and go play a gig 200 miles away to 50 people?

I have always felt drawn to music and the feeling that music evokes in me. It has also provided me with the opportunity to travel a lot around the world, and being able to bump into friends and visit old haunts, as well as discovering new acquaintances in towns and cities I’ve never visited is a big part of my life. In the last couple of years I have been fortunate enough to tour with Strike Anywhere around Europe again, and the camaraderie which I have always shared with them is something I treasure and hold dear. When it comes to playing – and it may seem like a cliché – but when I was first in a band I always thought that if you play to a people, there may be just one person who hasn’t heard you who might have just had their ears opened to something new, and every time I play, I think of that one person that I might be connecting with. Also, I find Bear Trade are a part of my family, and when we are together and away we are feeding off each other, making us better people, happier people. Without that, I truly believe that as an individual I would not have what I have to offer to my family at home, to share the experiences and energy and passion that I have that money or TV or Facebook can’t buy. To show my children who their dad really is.

All the band have “form” in the diy, independent music scene. Is that by design or chance and why?

I first started watching bands regularly in 1987 and then worked for bands from 1990. The independent music scene has always been in my blood and always will be. I feel strongly that whatever you put in, you will get back, either directly or indirectly. We looked after our own then, and still do now to a certain degree. To me, it has always revolved around people, and (especially in the early days) the trust and confidence that you have in individuals you have probably never met or even spoken to. I remember going on European tours with a piece of paper with an address and the promoters home phone number on and you rolled up 400 miles from home and that was all you had! You and I are probably a good example of this, having first met in 1991 (I think!) in Dublin when I travelled over with Drive and slept on top of the bass cab in their van for a fiver a day. I try to explain to people who ask that it worked just like Facebook in many ways, except with real people and real places and real situations. But I guess that would just make me old, right?

I’ve got to ask about Brexit as it’s referenced in one of your songs. Do you know anyone who voted for it and what is their reason? I ask because I can see the virtue in splitting the European Union but amn’t sure that’s why Brexit was so popular.

My parents voted for Brexit. We had a bit of a bust up last time I stayed with them after a few drinks. The suggestion was that they did it for their grandchildren…did what exactly, I’m unsure. It is very much indicative of the small town England mentality which still prevails, but this gave it a voice. The greatest despair is that people are so ignorant that they completely bypassed the realities of what Brexit would actually mean and simply voted out…as you say, the vote was not based on the pros and cons of leaving the EU, but more about our insecurities as a nation and an opportunity to sing Rule Brittania whilst waving a flag. I live in a small village in East Yorkshire now, and there were posters put up spreading the unsubstantiated claims and the underlying (at best) xenophobia and at worst straight up racism which this vote has given a voice to is depressing and worrying in equal measure. Humanity and compassion go out of the window, and it is the “foreigner” blamed for the failings of the very Government that these ignorant masses have continued to vote in. If I could emigrate I would seriously consider it.

Do you get a chance to play many gigs? Any chance you can get over to Ireland at some stage?

No. But yes.

No – because we all have family and responsibilities and sometimes these take priority for a period of time until we can work it all out.

Yes – because we all have family and responsibilities and sometimes we need to take priority for a period of time before we need to return to them.

niallhope

Thursday Tunes

Thursday tunes

This week we have mostly been listening to

Paranoid visions – Rebellion
Prolific Irish punks have another record out in tribute to the great punk festival that is rebellion. Of course the songs aren’t about the festival, instead they are songs of rage
Get the new record here

Bear Trade
Bleedin’ Heart Trouble

What a band, we will have an interview on the blog next week with English diy stalwarts Bear Trade. Think Leatherface, the replacements and wedding present getting together to write some songs with northern sensibility. As was said I he recent review “Silent unspeakable is not only 12 great singalong guitar songs but Greg singing about the reality of a world that has humans and a home life that isn’t perfect”

Martha
Chekhov’s Hangnail

“It might seem that we lost the battle
But no one wins the war”

Pop in sound but punk in attitude Martha are great, pure and simple.

Interrobang
Mad As Hell

Great interview on the site this week and when Dunstan sings he’s mad as hell and he’s not going to take it anymore we can only hope that the revolution will have such a soundtrack. I preordered the album yesterday so roll on October when it’s released on all the madmen

Diet Cig
Tummy Ache

New York Lofi punk pop two piece. Lovely tunes with a carefree attitude. Reminds me of an energetic Two piece playing like Allo Darlin. Debut album out now on Frenchkiss records

niallhope

Lee Harvey’s Interview

Dublin band the Lee Harvey’s have been on the go 8 years and in that time have released 3 albums on foad. I’ve seen them only a handful occasions but have always been impressed. Their sound has a feel not unlike those northern Irish bands on good vibrations but where good vibes had a lot of pop going on Lee Harvey’s are more rooted in clash and punk, lots of great melodies though. I’m sitting here listening to their Still Angry album on a plane journey back from Spain. I spend 7 days there on a family holiday and this was a perfect accompaniment for heading home. As I pondered going back to the real world and wondered what was going on in the world I had bitzy’s observations on the states in my ears. This album was written before the current President made claims for most powerful man in the world. No doubt that will provide fuel for rainforests of lyrics but the observation of

“It’s what you do that makes you count
Not who you serve”

is as deliberate as ever in the week white supremacists felt it was ok to March and then commit a terror attack. What will happen will become the history books of our children’s children, let’s hope it doesn’t repeat the mistakes of the past.

I sent Bitzy a few questions after their successful appearance at Rebellion and here is what he had to say.

For those interested can you give us a bit of history to a) the lee Harvey’s and b) some of the other bands you’ve played in? What do you do outside the band?

I formed The Lee Harveys in 2009 with Mike a guy from work who has gone back to New Zealand. I wanted it to be a sounding board about all things good and bad with the USA. It is a country full of contradictions…plenty of subject matter forever.

We did our first gig in Thomas House. Paul joined after that.

I was in The Strougers back in the 70’s and played the Dandelion market etc, Paul was in thee amazing colossal men, guernica and firewater creed. Tony was in jobseekers. We were a 3 piece for a long time until Rory joined on lead guitar

I work as an outreach worker with homeless drug users and people with alcohol issues

How did the three albums on FOAD come about? Who asked first and what does the process involve?

We recorded the first 2 albums in ashtown studios. PA and Whelo from the dubtones guested on guitar. basically PA said he would put the records out on FOAD which we were happy to do. Our current album is also on FOAD and fair play to them for helping us immensely. we sell cds at gigs basically. gun city is sold out and still angry is almost sold out so several hundred sales there.

how many times have you played rebellion? What are your honest impressions of it? Did your opinion change after attending the festival?

We’ve played rebellion 4 times. The first time is now part of folklore., too long to go into but I still have nightmares bout it. My impressions of rebellion are a very well oiled rock n roll machine. Its good to be rubbing shoulders with some of the punk rock legends, but there are some of the older bands from back in the day who seem happy to just play the circuit and not release anything new. Its a great festival run by great people.

can you tell me your favourite gig a) to play and b) to see ?

I loved playing with buzzcocks a few years back. rebellion, as i said, is great coz the sound ya get is second to none. Seeing the clash in TCD and Ramones 4 times was the ultimate.

what made you pick up an instrument to begin with and decide yes I can be in a band? What makes you keep doing it?

Punk happened at the right time for me, 1976, hearing new rose and seeing the radiators from space told me that anyone could do it, they were a great irish band. i do it for the love of music, not for money coz theres fuck all money in it and coz ive still got something to say.

we ain’t gonna ever play jazz, put it that way.

niallhope

Rebellion 2017 – Day 4

A Page Of Punk

And so it drifts to a close, we may want it to go for ever but most bodies can’t take the pace. There is a world out there to return to, families and friends to be cherished and minds to change. Again Rebellion has been a cracker, my years of animosity towards this festival were wrong for me. I spent a long time saying I didn’t want to see old fogies reliving their youth, but it’s great. The festival brings a community or, as Pete Stahl from Scream described it, a tribe together. We all have different parts to play in the tribe but it is ours.

I started late today, spent some time at the seaside, wishing the donkeys weren’t being used, before heading to see Pizzatramp. The venue was as packed as I’ve seen it for any on the intoducing stage. Pizzatramp are loud and fast. Their new drummer joined this morning which made for an interesting show. The blistering speed is fine if you’re used to drumming it’s only when bands decide to get cocky and include breaks in their songs. They even managed to play the same 20 second song 4 times.

Nicki Weller

John Robb’s chat with Jah Wobble co-incided but I head some of it. The literary stage isn’t there this year and it is a shame. The stories of punk rock are important and whilst we are there for the music it is necessary for the reasons behind it to be documented. Hopefully it will return next year. Barry Cain’s chat with Nicki Weller proves how important these talks are. Nikki spoke of managing the Jam’s fan club and correspondence they received. She was the curator for the From The Jam exhibition which made it to London and Liverppol and could yet travel to Amsterdam. barry cain sidetracked with his own stories but thankfully Nikki reeled it back in and told some lovely tales of her brother Paul.

Zounds were always trying something interesting when Crass and Conflict were challenging people with their lyrics and music. The arena had a huge crowd, many happy to rest their weary legs after 4 days but it was great to see Zounds on that stage.

Jon Langford is king to me. He would be my god if he didn’t eat meat so the see him Acoustic and with the Mekons was an honour. I don’t know what he eats but I do know he replied to a letter I sent as a 15 year old. I still have it somewhere as it’s the little things in life that can really matter. The Mekons were on stage with their original line up from 1977. songs like Fight The Cuts could have been written at anytime over the last 4 decades but it strikes me that we are back in those days, and it’s not nostalgia talking. Mekons were post punk almost as soon as they heard punk, they discovered country but always had the attitude of punk. It was, yet another, honour to sit and watch them play tonight. You’ve no idea how much.

I felt like a disloyal subject as I sneaked out of Jons acoustic set (sshhh don’t tell him) to watch a Page of Punk, but needed to. Japan know how to do extremes in music and A Page of Punk sure are extreme. This was a highlight of the unexpected. Incredible energy on stage and insane show. If ever you get a chance to see them please please do. The intensity of this band is phenomenal, everyone had a smile on their face.

Attila was back in the Opera House entertaining us all showing that there can be humour in the revolution. This splendid venue had hundreds of punks singing about prince Harry’s knob and the irony of it all wasn’t lost on Attila. The crowd in the acoustic room the other night were full of chat with their friends but opera house brought people in who wanted to see him and respected what was on offer.

Speaking of which Ruts DC burst the Almost Acoustic room yet again. You could slice the respect this crowd have for Ruts dc. Even though they can do no wrong they did everything right

Propagandhi were outside in the Casbah and were immense, in the rain. so much so that I barely caught the Skids but as I wandered home from Blackpool my dreams for 2018 had already started. To my tribe, thank you. Let’s keep on keeping on

Niallhope

Rebellion 2017 – Day 3

Rebellion 2017 Day 3

My introduction to los Fastidios came a few years ago. They had just finished an Irish tour that I missed out on. Their background is in oi music. They proudly proclaim football as an interest but also are anti fascist and animal rights exponents. Sure what’s not to like. Sing along intelligent anthems from Italy were the perfect post lunch punk tunes and as the new album proclaims the sound of revolution.

My journey to Rebellion music festival started when my brothers were bringing home/ punk records in the late 70’s early 80’s. I then started buying my own tapes and records and wrote to as many people as possible. AOA were one of the bands I wrote to. 35 years ago. I did an interview with them in my fanzine at the time and here they are now, singing anarcho punk songs to us. The topics they sing about are still the same with words being screamed on stage that none of us have any chance of understanding. Thankfully they talk between songs and have information on their records.

Radical Dance Faction were regular visitors to Ireland in the 90’s, amazing night how it doesn’t seem all that long ago. They are still banging out their white reggae whit lost post punk vocal.

The rhythmites played with nomeansno in mcgonagles, their reggae beat being the equivalent of what major promoters used to play through the speakers before the main band would come along. We decided we would provide our own soundtrack that night with nomeansno and rhythmites are still dancing to the revolution

The GAKK are from Dundalk and had their travelling home crowd out, complete with Dundalk fc flag. They play 77 style strong punk rock, lots of clash and ruts references. The travelling crew all ventured along to see Steve Ignorant and Paranoid Visions, but three days on veggie burgers meant I needed to get something else to eat. Amazingly Blackpool now has a vegan restaurant and top quality too. It meant missing out o. A selection of classic Crass, flux and Poison Girls songs being played by Paranoid Visions with vocal assistance from Steve a Ignorant. Some things you just have to live to regret.

My interest in bands like AOA slightly decreased when hardcore bands from Washington DC hit my radar, Scream being one of them. Today was special day, seeing Scream up on stage. I have been suspicious for years about bands reforming for events like this but as an attendee I sure am glad Scream are back. So tight, so good and with audience participation and a Bad brains cover to boot. Dave Ruffy, from The Ruts DC, will face competition for “drummer who makes it all look ao easy” as Kent played at breakneck speed right through and didn’t look like he broke a sweat. This was a lesson on hardcore history and I could quite easily have gone home content after this set

It was a huge contrast seeing the Tuffragettes. These, along with Brattakus and Petrol Girls are vital bands for our day. These are modern day Scream, they sound nothing like them but the energy and enthusiasm as shining. Synth punk smashing the stereotypes

Louise Distras played two sets tonight, her electric show last time was in the main Empress Ballroom but it was good to see her on the smaller Pavillion stage as well as acoustic. Tonight louise asked us all to fall in love and don’t fall in line. Wise words indeed that we all sang along to.

Ruts DC need no explaining. Part of the rebellion furniture at this stage, as vital as Steve Ignorant and TV Smith and as revered and respected as Cock Sparrer or any band that plays here. SUch good songs that have stood any test time may want to pass on. I danced and danced and delighted in the fact that I was here and this was happening.

Angelic upstarts had a huge crowd in the empress. Working class spokespeople and the 2,500 people were ready to give the fox a gun in any effort to bring back hunting. The upstarts have been on the go since 1977, 2 years prior to scream’s inception. Their tunes are more direct and as I wondered about the difference between the two bands I heard Mensi proclaiming from stage he will be the next James Bond and how surprised he was that “the lasses weren’t all rushing to the stage”. Their debut single “Teenage warning” came on and I then thought I noticed pete from gold blade and the membranes on guitar. I got confused as he was announced on stage as Neil. My eyesight is definitely going At least Louise distras calls it the Louise distras band and maybe the upstarts should really be the Mensi ensemble as he is the sole remaining original member

Bnorthen Irish punks took over in the form of Outcasts and Defects and we popped and pogoed into the late night

 

niallhope

Rebellion 2017 – Day 2

Before every trip to Blackpool I sit down, pore through the lineup and pick out the must see and the nice to see. I have a problem today. 34 bands are on the list. That may not have been an issue for 18 year old self but it is a problem. It will sort itself out over the 13 hours.

The way I see it is that I’m a sponge and rebellion is my education. I may never see some of these bands again, we may never be in the same country together so I want to make the most of it. Let’s go for 34

Poly-esters were new to me. Playing in the huge empress ballroom, home to Darts, they engaged and rocked the lunchtime crowd.

I’d been looking forward to seeing Petrol Girls. There’s a scene of bands out there that have wiped gender breakdown away. Of course it doesn’t matter what gender you are playing in a band but Petrol Girls are screaming out about misogyny and sexism and their toe tapping noise is a glorious soundtrack to that manifesto. Petrol Girls are top of the pile throwing away the punk stereotype and ready to challenge you if you’re too comfortable.

Matilda’s Scoundrels from Hastings have that folky punk sing along feel. You want to be in their gang. Im struck by the fact that they seem to be the first band not selling merchandise as the 6 piece take over the stage.

I guess the real mackenzies are a Canadian version of Matilda’s Scoundrels, it seems bizarre to me but Canadians in kilts singing about drinking and playing bagpipes is something I’ve missed out on. For years though I ignored drop kick Murphy’s and am now a convert so maybe there’s hope for me for the real mckenzies. To be honest I hope not

Interrobang are taking music and adding some theatre, trying to unsettle the crowd but playing angular music. It’s not in your face but they are looking to reach into your heart. Dunstan sings like he is starting in Chumbawamba once more and he is still angry after all these years and will never calm down. We need bands like interrobang telling us they as mad as hell.

I’ve been communicating with Doug from flies on you in various guises over 30 years it all started when he was bass player in nerve rack and talking about playing in ireland. That never happened and decades got lost. Now he is on the “new” band stage with flies on you who have two great albums out. Doug has dropped the bass but the acerbic sound remains and it’s a fall-esque sound, well starts with the fall and nerve rack and mixes a whole lot more in. Great to see them on stage.

The featherz brought some glam to the day, at least for the three songs I caught. Nice change to the wall of noise on offer elsewhere.

Dave dictor tempted us last night with acoustic versions but tonight was the turn of the powerful MDC, more relevant than ever.

I missed the FU’s when I started listening to American Hardcore. Boston punks exploded on the stage tonight. Even treating us to some straw dogs sings which is what some of the FU”s became for a while.

Subhumans never change, even if some of the personnel do. They are still as good as they were, and playing many of the songs they played in, the youth expression Centre in an early 1980s dublin. These are another necessary feature of Blackpool. Again more relevant now as our political structure becomes more similar to the 80s.

Same with DOA, Canadian punks screamed for change in the 80s. Lead singer Joey keithley ran for office. They wanted a better future. They got a different one, better in many ways but the question remains was it worth it? This three piece were are as fast and powerful as anything else today with some tunes there screaming out

 

Attila The Stockbroker is on great form. Not just politics but emotions too. It must be so frustrating for any artist with all talking going on in the background in the acoustic room as people settle in for a drink and a chat. Attila defied them and told us all about the band we should form called “winter vomiting bug” which was dedicated to the band sick on the bus. He gave some newer poems which detail how working class people are still second class citizens despite all the years of words

I never saw or listened to Frank Carter before except when he was in gallows who I didn’t enjoy that much. At one stage he got a circle pit going right round the hall and just like the junior b hurlers they ran and ran badly in that circle

It’s been an interesting festival as the politics of today has lead to a lot more statements from bands on stage. If we can’t talk about what’s going on what can we talk about?, and bands grasped that. They have also reached out to those struggling with mental illness and this punk rock community should know it’s ok not to feel ok and just talk if things are getting to you. We are all in this together, whatever this may be. Frank Carter reminded us of words Petrol Girls had spoken earlier, it’s fine to be down just share it and let’s look after each other.

Membranes are special to me. This is their home town, well it’s not really but it’s the original bands birthplace and singer john Robb, is the sole remaining original band member. They have diversified in recent years and the post punk sound is still there but drone and power are the main traits on display. Tonight they have the backing of a choir which just adds to the sense of surreal spectacular in this car park stage

Wonk unit are increasing in popularity by the day. Each gig sees them getting more popular. Second last band on the empress tonight and Earlier they played a stripped down version of their set in the acoustic room. Not even room to stand. Empress crowd weren’t left standing, we were too busy moving our feet.

Their good friends slaves followed them. For a two piece they can sure fill out a stage. For a drummer with two drums and 2 cymbals there is some sound on stage. At times it felt like maybe, just maybe, they were trying a tad too hard but the power was something else, as was the visuals

I wasn’t sure if their style of humour would suit that big stage. But it did. Alex treated the crowd as if we were visitors to his regal home, sticky dance floor and all. Wonk unit have been described as a modern day snuff and that’s not far off. They will play any gig, won’t get lost or worried in the trapping of success. And they listen to punk rock and know they are no different to us watching them. Perfect.

Kiss my acid were the first of many Irish bands for me to see today. Snotty abrasive tunes with green day playing grunge feel.

I am a car crash are gaining interest. It’s easy to see why, more rock than punk and more post the pre, it was great to see the dublin lads on the big arena stage.

Protex played the opera house. It gave us a chance to sit down, relax and enjoy their power pop tunes.

Lee Harvey’s have a 1978 feel to their sound but with power. Close your eyes and they could almost be part of that northern Irish good vibrations scene. Great set.

Paranoid Visions pack some power. Deko says they are tjebhate of the city’s well there’s a certain section thaysboroud of them. Singing and powerful as if killing joke had attitude for dinner. There is a large Irish contingent at rebellion playing and spectating. Most of these were in the large pavilion crowd tonight as the visions played more recent material and are as strong, prolific and valid as ever

Ok I didn’t quite make the 34 but managed to squeeze in songs from Godfathers, the Professionals, and Bono too

Niallhope